redistribution of wealth

Under a Hillary administration, it is likely that more women and people of color will find their way into elite positions within the current political and economic hierarchy. However, her idea of "breaking all barriers" does not include breaking the biggest barrier of them all -- runaway inequality.
Hillary Clinton's stated recently that she will not raise taxes on the middle class. She will raise taxes only on the rich and super rich. But at what income does the middle class end and the rich begin?
Even the esteemed Republican "with a big R" Mr. Milton Friedman the legend, turned to socialism when it came to promoting the general welfare and securing the blessings of freedom to ourselves and our children. It's why our Founding Fathers established the US Constitution.
In his State of the Union address President Obama called for tax increases for the wealthiest Americans. Does the public support these tax hikes, and how do their attitudes fit into larger perceptions about wealth?
It's not surprising that at this time of year, even if it's just during the pre-game interviews, I like to take a few minutes to celebrate what may be America's greatest socialist institution, and the active system of redistribution that helps make it so great.
Once a nation turns its back on a resolute determination to cultivate moral deservedness, political and financial superintendency passes to those who gain power illegitimately--a fact described eloquently by President Theodore Roosevelt.
The lack of a guaranteed income floor has been a social and cultural issue that has considerably affected America. It is also a leading reason why interpersonal violence, psychological struggle and economic collapse happen.
I don't know the answer to these questions, but my experience as a policy wonk and economist in government has led me to believe that economics, as currently practiced, is part of the problem.
The International Monetary Fund's First Deputy Managing Director David Lipton recently spoke about the global economy at the Aspen Institute in Washington, D.C. We sat down with Lipton before the Washington Ideas Roundtables Series event, where he discussed income inequality and his big idea for addressing it at an international level.
Today Pope Francis urged major U.N. governments to redistribute wealth to the poor and pushed for an end to the "economy of exclusion." We discuss what his latest message means for poverty, politics and the church.