redlining

Faulting the U.S. government for trying to end redlining seems to be a cornerstone of Sen. Ron Johnson’s political career.
On the other hand, the FHA drew red lines around predominantly black neighborhoods and refused to back loans in these typically
Penn State graduate students live two paradoxes: We are tax-paying citizens, yet the State College Borough Planning Commission does not consider us members of the community. We are educators and researchers but are not recognized as employees of Penn State.
The settlement includes an $825,000 fund to boost homeownership in the neglected areas.
An alphabet soup of players and policies could have a big impact on where you live, how much you pay for housing, and whether or not you are denied a chance to move into a neighborhood that's good for your kids.
While some households and neighborhoods have recovered from the recession, most black and Latino households and neighborhoods are still waiting to recover.
The lawsuit, first reported by The New York Times, charges that the bank mapped out the city and limited its mortgage products
Last week, Atlantic correspondent Ta-Nehisi Coates emerged from the self-imposed reclusiveness that followed his landmark
As my partner and I are both attorneys who work on and in support of public education, private school was not an option for us, so we decided to look for homes further out but with highly rated public schools. At the risk of sounding naïve, I was wholly unprepared for the reality that came with prioritizing high-quality public schools in my home search.
It's long been one of the country's designated loser cities, beginning in the 1960s, when change hit it hard. The phrase at the time was "urban blight," a social cancer with unexamined causes that, in the ensuing years, has gotten progressively worse.
People of color disproportionately received federally insured loans -- backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) or Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) -- to finance the purchase of their homes and to refinance existing mortgages.
A new report from seven housing and policy agencies suggests evidence of a two-tiered mortgage market in which borrowers and communities of color are increasingly cut off from prime conventional financing.
It has become increasing clear that there are large numbers of qualified borrowers who can't get a loan. Disturbingly, there are signs of a racial pattern to this phenomenon.