regifting

Re-gifting is a touchy and sometimes complex topic that can readily turn a delightful gift exchange into an awkward and uncomfortable
5. Home Depot To exchange items or to get a full refund at Home Goods, the store asks that you do so within 30 days of purchase
They look at you, these women, as you unwrap what they've given because they know your actual reaction will be evident in your facial expression even as your mouth is forming the words "Oh! How wonderful!"
The gift isn't on its way to the trash. If you were going to throw it away, then don't give it away. C'mon... would you want
Is it proper to re-gift something that you don't want or need? Many years ago etiquette experts discouraged the practice. But times have changed and so have our gift-giving habits.
In this story, it's a real-life competition to defy death. Because the punishment of knocking off first will mark the culmination of a nearly four-decade-long practical joke -- quite possibly the longest ongoing joke in the history of prank-manship.
Before you pass along someone else's "treasure," let's review a few re-gift giving rules.
Here's a riddle: Is it a regift if it's done in such a way that the recipient has no idea it was a regift? That's what the
Post50 editors say: Meeting the family is the easy part. It's the next 40 years that are problematic. ● I am recently divorced
I unwrap the package and discover the youthful, bright blue, dangling earrings that more closely resemble something you'd put on the tree than a middle-aged mom's lobes. "Put them on, Mom," he practically begs.
I am like the mother who gave her son two ties for Christmas. He went to the hall mirror, put on one of them, and turned to show her how it looked, "What," she said disappointedly, "You didn't like the other one?"
Etiquette expert Mindy Lockard appeared on HuffPost Live to discuss the right way to handle gifts that people dislike. Host
Still, one may legitimately ask: "Is it ethical to give someone else a present I was given but don't need or want?" The answer may surprise you: Yes, it is right to regift. In fact, we have a duty to do so. Here's why.
Say bye-bye fruitcake and hello cool, creative and festive this holiday. These hostess gifts are sure to kick off some party conversation and keep you on the VIP guest list for the rest of the year.
Due to the "great recession" we have become increasingly more time crunched and more thoughtful about over-spending. It only makes sense that with these changes in our lives we have also seen a change in our philosophy toward re-gifting.
In this age of green giving, when many of us have accumulated way too much stuff, re-gifting seems to have become a bit more socially acceptable. Giving away things that we know we will never use -- and that someone else would like -- that's admirable, right?