religion and technology

Benek said we may need to shift our understanding of what it means to be human in order to really understand how robot preachers
I hear this phrase frequently, and think, are these times inherently different? Larger than life? Miraculous? Or like the great flood, globally destructive? Whether you're religious or not, 'Biblical' evokes images of a strategic shift.
“If a mythology is a sacred narrative or collection of traditional stories, then all religions include mythologies as integral
Apple, Microsoft and Google declined to comment on whether they plan to use any of the religious emojis. “I think instead
One reason? They’re logging on to the Internet. Stephen O’Leary, an associate professor at the University of Southern California
What happens when you can't physically make it to the pew to hear the uplifting sermon or get to the meditation hall for a comforting prayer? At these times, rather than going to church, ashram, temple or mosque, a growing number of individuals are going digital.
That a large number of Americans appears to face particular anguish related to the proliferation of pornography merits dialogue and understanding, not ridicule.
In the past, technological culture-changers like the telephone and electricity took a long time to produce and cultures had more time to absorb and contemplate their impact. Now, things are changing so fast that we have little time to contemplate and absorb their impact.
So many of us are in constant motion, hurtling down the street with smartphone in hand, running from work to social lives to home, running from north to east to south and back again, chasing a truth of some sort and not finding it -- and, perhaps, wondering why we're not hearing God's voice more often than we do.
A saffron-robed monk chats on a cell phone or contemplates an iPad. This photo is meant to conjure contradiction -- a clash of cultures as ancient tradition meets modern technology. Yet, each time I see such images, they evoke for me the opposite.