Religious experience

"It turns out there's a lot of pent-up desire," he said on "Conan."
Student: I think that human motives are enough to be good. Those who are good because they believe in an afterlife aren't
While in Brazil -- a 10-day trip he took at the urging of his wife, the musician Edie Brickell, who had traveled to Abadiânia
The anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann wrote a New York Times op-ed recently about all of my favorite topics: dreams, sleep, religion, psychology, culture, and science. I wrote a letter in response, focusing on the religious studies angle of her argument. There's an intriguing psychological angle, too: a great deal of research shows that people's attitudes about dreams can have a direct impact on the their dream recall frequency.
The argument from ignorance is a logical fallacy, also known as the God-of-the-gaps argument, whereby someone says, "I am unaware of a natural explanation for [some phenomenon]; therefore we have evidence for the supernatural."
Secular prophecies to the contrary, religion is not going away. And despite the hopes of certain nostalgic believers, religion will not regain, at least in the West, the social ascendancy it once enjoyed.
Science is naturally skeptical, initially couched in doubt. Though doubt might be a stumbling block for science, it is a stepping stone for faith.
I offer this thought as a guide: whatever your worship, ask yourself, "did my heart express itself today?" If so, you have truly prayed.
My views about God, my feelings about myself and others, and my views regarding the universe shifted, or better, morphed into something infinitely more meaningful than I could have ever imagined.
By Ron Csillag Religion News Service (RNS) Dirt at an ancient holy site in Chimayo, N.M. reputedly cures a woman's rare bone