religious understanding

Catechism classes were part of the Catholic education I received. But regardless of how much we know about religion, isn't it the same truth that we all come to sooner or later?
Bob Burnett, Jacob Lupfer and Frank Schaeffer join Abby to debate whether or not Republicans are the most religious political party.
How did evangelical Christians, who have been dedicated to the care of all people and at the forefront of social reform in America, come to be broadly identified with intolerance and a lack of compassion?
Pluralism is not a religion; it is an attitude of respecting the otherness of others and accepting the God given uniqueness of each one of us.
At a time when conflict is already lethal and interreligious understanding is more urgently needed than ever, some might argue that we should gloss over the points of difference. I agree about the need for interreligious understanding; I disagree about the recipe for achieving it.
Rabbinic sages often referred to humans as 'creatures that speak.' While language that we find for sacred experience may be inadequate to convey the significance of that experience, it is upon us to search for those words.
If you make a decision, in your own life, to reach out across the sometimes wide chasm of religious beliefs and practices, you can make a difference.
One of the best ways to dismiss the ideas of others, without ever having to think about them, is to label them as quickly as they are uttered. Some roads to hell may be paved with good intentions, but others are made smooth by a flippant bigotry that avoids truth by stereotyping.
The bottom line is that no matter what our beliefs are, they are often based largely on interpretations handed to us by others.
What brought these and others from across the globe to Israel this sunny day in October was their firm belief in a certain set of principles. Foremost among them was a belief in the oneness of man.
Don't think that a Muslim American women's chagrin is limited to Halloween. Ignorance about hijab is a year-around phenomenon in some segments of our society.
One thing we all agree on: No matter what religion a person prescribes to, at the beginning and end of the day, it is the love, respect, decency and kindness we share that matters.
To pray for peace is not to seek a healing that is contrary to our deepest instinct. It is rather, as Mahatma Gandhi said, to get in touch with "the intense longings of the human heart."
These incidents are not widespread. But we call on the demonstrators and the communities involved to stand as one and denounce the hate now -- and at every future opportunity.
When we see all the evil that is done in the name of religion, we naturally want no part of it. But the truth is, the problem isn't with religion per se. The problem is with seeing religion as an end unto itself.
I am impressed by how often certain atheists' posts make knowledgeable references to elements of faith and wonder if their quarrel is not so much with God.
Fear is immobilizing and it keeps us separated. Our "them and us" mentality has no place in a country that is working to be a democracy, and it certainly has no place in our communities of faith.
We need reminders of the people in our past that established greatness through kindness. The Prophet Muhammad was one of these men.
When it comes to guaranteeing freedom of religion, it matters much less what nations say in their constitutions than what they are prepared to do to enforce those laws.
Politicians should have a moment of truth and admit that the cost of these wars, both in human and economical terms, far outweighs what they have achieved on the ground.