rene magritte

In this fascinating exhibition, Warren finds undercurrents of the surreal coursing through artworks one would not usually associate with Surrealism, deftly expanding the definition whilst introducing a wide range of works.
It was an unseasonably warm day last summer when I found myself climbing the towering steps known as "Montagne de Bueren" in the Belgian city of Liege. I had just arrived at my hotel and was feeling antsy, a little displaced and in need of some geographical cohesion.
Jonathan Miller's 1997 production of The Rake's Progress, revived at the Metropolitan Opera House for the first time since 2003, and around for only two additional performances, eschews the look.
It is drizzling. Of course it is. The damp air smells of metro fumes and a hint of Terre d'Hermès as I painfully drag my suitcase up the stairs and onto le boulevard Saint Michel. I look around. Red lipstick stands out against the gray sky.
Much like the 1970s punk rock scene belonged to New York and Los Angeles was the birthplace of 1950s film noir, no locale is more synonymous with Modernism than Paris. Aspiring and established artists alike flocked from around the world to access the creative energy.
It is 117 years since the birth of the Belgian painter René Magritte. The 117th anniversary is the most important for any
Two concurrent exhibitions in New York at the end of 2014 prove that the Surrealist legacy still informs some of the most vital and psychologically compelling art of the late 20th century -- as it still informs, albeit critically and via ironic realignments, a good deal of contemporary art today.
In a world drenched with 24/7 information, what's wrong with just experiencing art for yourself? Who says you have to "study up?" Museum exhibitions are designed to inform. You don't need to arm yourself in advance as if you're going into hazardous territory, you don't need to do homework.
Moby Dick (Merrilees) 2013 Landers' paintings depict the animal kingdom somewhat domesticated by the tartan pattern wrapped
Let's look at how it's painted. Seen at a distance, or on a computer screen, it produces a nearly dazzling sense of the unification of complex elements.
Magritte's paintings, while traditional in technique (often oil on canvas), are innovative and witty in concept. Doubling, fragmentation, displacement, and irrational juxtapositions are his favored strategies.
Embracing dichotomy, stitch-by-stitch, is finally what lends Maiwald's pieces both their intimate and universal powers.
René Magritte (Belgium, 1898-1967). La clairvoyance (Clairvoyance). 1936. Oil on canvas. 21 1/4 x 25 9/16″ (54 x 65 cm). Mr
Surrealist artist Rene Magritte's paintings came to life in Chicago as the The Auxiliary Board of the Art Institute of Chicago celebrated its 40th anniversary with its Nothing Is As It Appears masked ball.
Furr's grandmother introduced him to oil paints when he was 12 years old. He would set up a still life with fruit and paint it. He was obsessed -- he loved and still loves oil paint and the distinct smell of pure turpentine. "I was lucky. I found my dharma at age 12 years," he says.
Art historians have toiled over the mystery of a missing Rene Magritte painting for years, with many assuming his work, "The
But what is great about editions and multiples, is that they are meant to be more accessible and fun. These often whimsical objects can lend a breath of creativity to the more functional areas of life -- like kitchenware, rugs, jewelry and furniture.
Are we witnessing a new epoch of exceptionally bright and gifted directors, writers, and actors infusing pop culture with winks to high culture or possibly converging the two?