Renewable portfolio standard

As renewable energy targets are met, states must decide whether to expand them.
· Continue driving the cost of clean technology down as fast as possible, making it a financial no-brainer for all buyers
Federal action on wind and solar in the United States has been historically slow and inadequate. A disheartening number of U.S. lawmakers still won't even accept the urgent need to lower carbon emissions by accelerating our transition away from burning fossil fuels.
Most of the chatter about this coal state is that it's recalcitrant when it comes to acting on climate change. And while some of that skepticism is certainly valid, there's lots happening in Bluegrass Country when it comes to green energy.
With news that global carbon dioxide emissions have reached record levels, the need to switch to a low-carbon economy is more urgent than ever. However, the urgency of this crisis does not absolve us of the responsibility to move forward in a just, sustainable way.
Exelon has a long history of using political influence to oppose the deployment of renewable energy. Exelon’s political operations
Almost every player has ties back to Koch Industries CEO Charles Koch, and despite previous failures, the formula is exactly the same.
Since clean energy still remains more expensive than fossil-fuel energy, mandating its procurement necessarily entails a small monthly surcharge upon utility customers. But why should some customers pay while others do not?
The Ohio legislature approved the renewable energy and efficiency standards in 2008, when it passed them almost unanimously
These pro-clean technology policies are creating jobs and helping ratepayers -- it's a win-win for Ohio, just not for utility and fossil fuel interests that want to sell more dirty electricity.