Representative democracy

We're not stupid. There's a sense that the system is broken, because it is. The media decry our lack of engagement in the political process, and the political party leaders sigh at the apparent collective indifference to their pleas for higher voter turnout. But to what end?
At the center of Evenwel v. Abbott is a math problem: How do we calculate the size of legislative districts? The answer to that question depends on how we define the principle of "one person, one vote."
The discrepancy between the U.S. and Europe in what concerns direct democracy is shocking and absurd in this day and age. Current electoral systems in Southern Europe are an assault on the ideal of a modern democracy.
Mob democracy is a violent form of direct democracy, periodically activated in Pakistan to confuse, frighten, and undermine representative governments established under the Pakistan Constitution.
What we ought to do is scrap this system and replace it with one consisting of four major parties. Even this will not cover all Americans, but it will certainly encompass more of us and within a more rational framework. For what might these four major parties stand?
At this point in our history, I am certain the country would be listed in realtor's terms as a "fixer-upper" or a "handyman special." This country might not have a long history compared with others around the world, but it has a strong one.
These folks are what we refer to as the looney tunes fringe of the electorate. They have a right to their own opinion and we would like to see them have rights as individuals clustered together to secede from the United States.
A large part of the pervasive distrust of our political institutions and elected officials reflects the continuing inability of a system to do what we need and not what we want.
If America is truly supposed to be exceptional in all things, why do other countries -- almost without exception -- decide our governmental structure isn't really for them, when it comes time to choose?
So many political pundits claim to know what "We, the People" want. They claim to have polled a sufficient number of folks from every walk of life and to know error what it is the people desire.
The simple truth is that when American corporations pursue profit -- successfully or not -- as long as they stay within the law, they are functioning exactly as we designed them to.
The partisan dynamics currently at play on Capitol Hill resemble a high school full of cliques, power differentials, and image-conscious participants more than a democratic problem-solving body.