resilient cities

I just returned to the United States from California and want to share some observations from my time away. The most important of these: California approaches have proven central to addressing the world's climate crisis.
The SDGs and the Paris climate agreement are clearly interconnected and any effort to tackle one without immediate consideration of the other will do serious disservice to both.
On the eve of the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, and as direct participants in its aftermath and recovery, it's important to look back and chronicle the lessons the country has learned -- and how much it has yet to understand about how to recover from such disasters.
"I think the challenge is then for the cities to make the private sector realize that (spending to protect) these public
The end is near! Or so it seems. In mid-March, a University of Maryland study concluded that civilization is racing toward collapse, due to extreme economic inequality and over-consumption of resources stretching the earth's carrying capacity.
What this should tell us is that we haven't learned enough from Hurricane Sandy. Storms happen. Trees go down, and the utilities can't provide power. It's the same old same old.
By pursuing the resilience dividend, cities can get an economic leg up and better prepare for what's next. Because no matter if the next shock hits tomorrow or 10 years from now, resilience is something a city can realize the benefits of each and every day.
You don't have to be an environmentalist to buy or invest in clean energy. You should do that if you simply want to keep your lights on during the next storm.
For a resilient food supply, we need to keep our specialty farmers farming and we need to make it monetarily worth their while not to sell out. We need to replace abandoned acres of asphalt with small allotments and grow crops.