resuscitation

Death will not escape us, any of us. Though it seems that death has a fond proclivity for me, it has followed me throughout my life thus far. Case-in-point, I started writing this from a room in a hospice center, watching as my father-in-law took some of what were his last breaths.
Paramedics with the most experience with cardiac arrest achieve the highest survival rates in patients.
My advice to those kids, and to all kids, is to keep thinking outside the box, think up, and work on, solutions that seem unconventional. Because it is the unconventional people just like them who have moved STEM fields forward, and it will be the unconventional thinkers like them who will continue to do so.
Somewhat recently a cardiac arrest survivor I helped to resuscitate was diagnosed with a terminal disease. This brought about the question, is it better to go quickly, not knowing the end is near, or is it better to have extra time on this earth, but know that you and your family may have to endure an end full of potential suffering? 
From the obvious religious overtones to news stories and TV shows about people returning to life, it's clear this is a story
What happens when we die? The once-held philosophical idea that there is no way back after death is not accurate and that there is a significant period of time after death in which death is fully reversible. The goalposts have moved, and we don't know where the science will take us.
Any efforts by the medical profession to curb patient autonomy deserve strict scrutiny lest we return to the unfortunate era of paternalism. And it will not be easy to effect these types of changes.
Richard Barton, the prosecutor in the case, told jurors in his opening remarks. "Karl Harris didn't act in accordance with