Rethink Afghanistan

The United States continues to spend $4 million per hour on a war in which Washington, D.C. has lost the plot.
For every multi-million dollar bomb we drop, we become even more unsafe.
Although the numbers and popularity of academic institutes is growing up, especially in the last decade, academic freedom is dwindling.
What's the best way to thank Afghans who have risked their lives helping U.S. troops? Offer them a chance to live in America, and then make the process impossible and the costs astronomical.
All over the world, people are rising up to support their communities towards sustainability and collective liberation. This week we share about two grantees in Oakland California who have launched local businesses that support and empower marginalized communities.
Contrary to the principle of reconciliation, during the last decade the government's efforts have not resembled negotiations, but an offer of surrender and the Taliban declared that they will not give up, surrender, and accept imprisonment - rather, they will continue their resistance.
As the U.S. grapples with other pertinent issues such as wage stagnation, healthcare funding, and education, the billions that were spent on the Afghanistan War has detracted from governmental investment in other vital areas.
What children in places like Afghanistan show us is so different from what we as adults show them. When they are exposed to media they hear about the political shortcomings and violence. When they see themselves, the reflection is refugee camps with sad faces and poverty.
In the backdrop of U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to India, Samarth Pathak gets you fresh perspectives on bilateral ties in a candid interaction with three of India's leading strategic thinkers.
Was "Outfoxed" controversial at the time? Ten years ago, documentary maker Robert Greenwald released a film with a controversial