retirement crisis

As a seniors’ advocate who’s worked on aging policy issues for decades, one of the most common questions I hear during campaign
With the future of Social Security uncertain and an increasing number of workers approaching retirement, having access to intuitive, low-cost retirement plans along with a sound strategy to work toward retirement goals is more important than ever.
Financial advisors, money managers and other financial services professionals can uniformly attest to the gap that exists between what individual investors expect to live on in retirement and what they are likely to have, based on what they've accumulated to date.
The retirement crisis is anything but imaginary. In a recent working paper, we find that only 44 percent of workers in the United States have access to a retirement plan at work.
Senior homeowners who would not endanger their goals might improve their lives by taking a HECM reverse mortgage. Such seniors
Momentum continues to build inside and outside the halls of Congress to reverse course on the single-minded quest to cut Social Security benefits which has dominated our political discourse for years.
Three decades of stagnant middle-class incomes, disappearing pensions, limited ability to start and maintain personal savings, and the failure of the 401K experiment lay the foundation for a retirement crisis that could further threaten millions of older Americans and their families.
The only thing more frustrating than the media's refusal to cover America's retirement crisis is that the trade group for the mutual funds who manage 401(k) assets continues to insist that the crisis doesn't exist.
Elizabeth Warren called for expanding Social Security benefits and slammed the Washington Post's 'uglier' argument that the country should pit children against seniors in a battle for 'crumbs.'
That said, the ING study highlighted some startling figures: "57 percent [of Hispanics] have never calculated how much money