retirement income

13. Tour or museum guide. If you're a local history buff or love the arts, consider finding opportunities to be a local tour
Many employers are focused on helping their workforce achieve retirement readiness. This is good for workers to help them achieve retirement in a manner they want, but this also helps the employer to achieve a healthy balance of talent.
Of course, for investors who have longer term perspectives on the stock market and investing the old 'buy and hold' philosophy
I recently had my own Groundhog Day scenario, but it wasn't about improving my physical health and wellness. I took part in a research project involving one-on-one interviews with Americans of all ages and backgrounds, to hear about their retirement plans and overall financial wellness.
Is it just me, or does anyone else feel like we bypassed Halloween and Thanksgiving and went straight to Christmas? I kid you not, winter holiday decorations began emerging in malls, towns and stores in September.
First comes love, then comes marriage, then comes figuring out what the hell to do about Social Security. Retirement planning can be quite complicated for anyone, but the newness of Social Security options for LGBT couples find some of us unprepared.
My visit with Jason followed on the heels of some extensive research I was involved in, to gain a better understanding of millennials' financial habits. That research illustrated a number of key themes that highlighted how to help millennials save money and prepare for the future.
For many people, one of the biggest adjustments in retired life is learning how to manage their money without the regular income sources they've grown accustomed to in their working years.
My visit with Jason followed on the heels of some extensive research I was involved in, to gain a better understanding of millennials' financial habits. In addition, we also investigated the role (or lack thereof) a financial advisor plays in helping millennials plan and save. The results? As varied as their personalities.
I recently had the opportunity to spend some time with Jason Dorsey, chief strategy officer for The Center of Generational Kinetics. Known as the Gen Y Guy, Jason is an acclaimed keynote speaker, generational researcher and best-selling author.
Just because employees are hardworking and loyal doesn't automatically mean they are financially astute and do a good job at planning for retirement, nor does it mean newer employees are bad at managing their money.
I'm turning 70 in a few months and know I'll be forced to withdraw money from my retirement accounts. How does that work and are there some special rules I need to be aware of?
As retirement gets closer, many people begin to worry about how they will find the funds they need to replace their paychecks after they've stopped working. What will serve as their income? Will they have enough to live on day-to-day? Will their money last long enough?
This demographic trend combined with longer life expectancies due to medical advances and a historically low birth rate have helped to create a perfect storm for potential future insolvency.
If you could go back 30 years and give yourself one piece of advice regarding retirement planning, what would you say?
If you want to grab the attention of the millennial generation, you need to personalize and tighten-up your communications approach -- which frankly, is how we should have been doing it all along.
Losing the ability to earn income can be pretty scary. Think about it. You've worked for decades receiving a check every two weeks, and all of a sudden it isn't there anymore! When you retire you'll have to make several shifts.
A recent study by the U.S. Government Accountability Office indicated that "some 155,000 older Americans are now seeing deductions from their Social Security checks to pay off their federal student loans - up from 31,000 a decade ago."