richard florida

Arts and culture aren't just features of great cities--amenities that make them nice places to visit. They are city builders, author and urbanist, Richard Florida has long argued.
With nearly six million residents and a gross regional product topping $300 billion, Greater Miami is now comparable in size and economic power to Singapore or Hong Kong.
Architecture and design that is tied intrinsically to its community helps to create an authentic sense of place that is unique and appealing, they noted, while highlighting a community's soul, history, and uniqueness.
With the backdrop of Art Basel, Florida International University and the Creative Class Group will host an exclusive forum with international cultural icons about how to keep artists and creators in the heart of our cities, on Thursday, December 3rd from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Miami Beach Urban Studios.
World-renowned artists, 250 galleries, museum curators and directors, highbrow collectors, celebrities, and more than 50,000 fans of modern and contemporary art will gather in Miami Beach this week for the annual Art Basel.
Last week over 300 people turned out at the College for Creative Studies to participate in CREATE: Detroit, the inaugural ideas fest on place making and cities, led by world-renowned urbanist and professor Richard Florida.
It's a fact of life: cities rise and cities decline. While the largest can hold their dominance for a very long time, second- and third-tier cities come and go.
Why have ideas of contemporary thinkers like Thomas Friedman proved to be incomplete only ten years after they defined the brave new world we live in. Today's world changes at the speed of light and, unless these thinkers can ride on those light particles their insights will only paint a partial picture that lasts for no more than a minute.
Great cities shape their own narratives and they create new lessons for the world. Though Detroit has been the poster-child for urban distress, it is also charting a new path back.