richard florida

The opening of SNL's goes like this: "The unthinkable has happened .... You could move to Canada but you love your country
Arts and culture aren't just features of great cities--amenities that make them nice places to visit. They are city builders, author and urbanist, Richard Florida has long argued.
With nearly six million residents and a gross regional product topping $300 billion, Greater Miami is now comparable in size and economic power to Singapore or Hong Kong.
Architecture and design that is tied intrinsically to its community helps to create an authentic sense of place that is unique and appealing, they noted, while highlighting a community's soul, history, and uniqueness.
With the backdrop of Art Basel, Florida International University and the Creative Class Group will host an exclusive forum with international cultural icons about how to keep artists and creators in the heart of our cities, on Thursday, December 3rd from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Miami Beach Urban Studios.
World-renowned artists, 250 galleries, museum curators and directors, highbrow collectors, celebrities, and more than 50,000 fans of modern and contemporary art will gather in Miami Beach this week for the annual Art Basel.
Last week over 300 people turned out at the College for Creative Studies to participate in CREATE: Detroit, the inaugural ideas fest on place making and cities, led by world-renowned urbanist and professor Richard Florida.
It's a fact of life: cities rise and cities decline. While the largest can hold their dominance for a very long time, second- and third-tier cities come and go.
Why have ideas of contemporary thinkers like Thomas Friedman proved to be incomplete only ten years after they defined the brave new world we live in. Today's world changes at the speed of light and, unless these thinkers can ride on those light particles their insights will only paint a partial picture that lasts for no more than a minute.
Great cities shape their own narratives and they create new lessons for the world. Though Detroit has been the poster-child for urban distress, it is also charting a new path back.
This increase in population growth brings several challenges; cities must plan for increased demand for services: energy, food and water, transportation, housing, land, health, education and much more
While heavy metal might be most common in "the most advanced, most tolerant, and knowledge-based places in the world," Florida
"I'm sure I'm not the first person to tell you this, but do what you love. You'll always need to make a living, but if you want to be happy -- if for that matter, you want to be successful -- money should never be your biggest goal."
Every city hopes to attract the next Facebook, Google, Instagram or Twitter. To lure such startups, they follow the same route -- cutting taxes, easing regulations, and in general trying to create a business-friendly climate. But what are entrepreneurs really looking for in a city?
New data confirm that central cities continue to grow faster than their suburbs. This still relatively new trend reverses a century of just the opposite, when city dwellers fled to suburbs and sprawl ate up the countryside.
In this increasingly competitive world, entrepreneurs need all the tips and advice they can get. Here are some of the top tips for start-ups from successful start-ups.
After a decade in which Miami has rapidly grown and urbanized (e.g., some 23,000 new condos in downtown, which are now more than 90 percent occupied) and distinguished itself as an international center of creativity; in order to compete on a global scale the city and region now need to take the next leap.
For decades now, Detroit has been one of America's most notorious clusterf*cks. Once the nation's fourth-largest city, its current population of just over 700,000 is less than 40 percent of its postwar peak of 1.8 million, and it's predicted to fall even further.
This video documents the forum my husband Richard Florida participated in with members of the institute and the local community -- he from Toronto, them from a fenced in compound in the rain forest.
The U.S. has always been attractive to bright people with something to get away from. Identifying the pull -- or what they are attracted to -- is more complex and more interesting.