Richard Matheson

Brian DeLeeuw is a novelist and screenwriter. After graduating from Princeton, he received his MFA from The New School. His first novel, In This Way I Was Saved, was long-listed for the Dylan Thomas Prize. His second novel is The Dismantling.
Simon Toyne is the author of the highly acclaimed Sanctus trilogy. Simon graduated from Goldsmith's College in London with a degree in English and Drama. He worked in British television for nearly 20 years as a producer. I
Genre film lost one of its most influential forces last week when author and screenwriter Richard Matheson passed away. Matheson was able to imbue his scripts with a contemporary outlook and an incisive inquest into the human condition that helped define genre film.
A science fiction legend has passed... RealD has plans to go big... Stephen Moyer starts looking for Evidence...
Sometimes there is that movie that reaches out and grabs us and we may be ashamed when someone asks about your favorite movie. For me, that is the 1980 film Somewhere in Time: a romantic tale of time-crossed lovers. Now Ken Davenport is bringing that story to the stage as a musical.
Readers can love a novel or short story for many reasons -- including expert prose, a compelling plot, and well-drawn characters. There's also the appeal of what might be called the "recognition apparition."
The official Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots movie is still in the planning stages, but until then, we have Real Steel, the family-friendly take on a world in which the squared circle has been commandeered by mechanical pugilists while the humans stay safely in their seats.
Even though it was never a top 25 show, The Twilight Zone was an oasis in television wasteland that captured a generation. However, it almost didn't happen.
The Bronte sisters weren't alone in blood being as thick as ink.
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What Dreams May Come bombed -- it only recouped $55 million of its $85 million budget at the domestic box office -- and it
An un-Christmas book takes place at Christmastime, but its tone, story and subject matter have nothing to do with the season. It provides perfect cover when the Noël nags accuse you of being a holiday poop.
Some bad movies you slag off gleefully. Others provoke a certain disappointment at their failure, a mourning at the difference between the film's ambition and its execution. Richard Kelly's The Box is such a film.