Rick Santelli

"You’re doing a disservice to the viewer," CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin snapped back. "I would like to keep our viewers as healthy as humanly possible."
Rick Santelli suggested “maybe we’d just be better off if we gave it to everybody and then in a month it would be over.”
“The government is promoting bad behavior.” These were Rick Santelli’s words on the floor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange
Predictably, the bond market and the Dow Jones average both fell quickly on CNBC's one-sided call, bringing quick profits to short hedge funds using high frequency trading to move quickly in and out of the market.
Wah, wah, wah! That's the collective whining of Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus and several GOP presidential candidates complaining of unfair, biased, mean-spirited debate moderators and their "gotcha" questions.
Palin's accelerated descent this week represents a larger trend within the conservative media. It represents the decline of the tea-party wing of the right-wing press and how a once-flourishing enterprise of outside upstarts, with their eyes on disrupting the GOP hierarchy, have in recent years faded in terms of importance and prestige within that sphere.
CNBC should be asking itself why on earth it continues to show such favoritism for the views of market pessimists and short sellers -- indeed, even facilitating such traders profit strategies -- at the expense of their retail TV audience.
Isn't it strange that the GOP, the political party that has heretofore consistently and vociferously opposed frivolous lawsuits, spurious malpractice claims and the trail lawyers' lobby, has now decided to spend taxpayer money to hire trial lawyers to bring what is essentially a frivolous malpractice lawsuit against President Obama?
TIME explained Santelli's argument in its deconstruction of the on-screen fight: "It's impossible for you to have been more
Steve Liesman Squares Off With Rick Santelli