right to be forgotten

A London judge says Google must scrub search results related to one man’s prior criminal conviction — but not for another man.
"The Internet would only be as free as the world's least free place," the company wrote on its Europe policy blog.
In my spring course about technology and politics, we discussed how technology is viewed as good or bad, and the impact it has on society. After hearing about the "right to be forgotten" debate in class, I tried to look at the ruling and its impact from different viewpoints.
American ingenuity is alive and well. We've changed the rules of the game, invented new playing fields, and blazed new paths. Europeans would admit this reality as much as we do ourselves. The divide therefore comes when Europe thinks these services don't protect the individual.
The move ratchets up the pressure on Google a year after the European Court of Justice gave residents the ability to ask
This exchange between European and American perspectives is healthy. So is the heated public debate over the wisdom of the right that has ensued in Europe, the United States, and elsewhere
Most data is stored by states and businesses. The question of data tracking and reporting by states and business is a current focus of digital policy discussions.
The day after some worldwide delinking starts being implemented, nothing will stop undemocratic and illiberal places from hosting a search engine that provides links to all information anyway. It would be ironic if we were to find information using a search engine based in North Korea because it were more complete than the local ones.
It is expected to publish a report with its conclusions at the end of January to help inform Google on its application of
Although the Right to be Forgotten ruling, to date, may have affected content that is mostly trivial, the precedent of governmental censorship across borders, once established, can't be easily confined to information that society doesn't much care about.