Robert Bork

This post first appeared at BillMoyers.com The one question you never hear journalists ask Republicans is why? Why do so
Conservatives have placed their hatred of liberalism above their love of country. There will be no reconciliation, just litigation.
Anthony Giardina's The City of Conversation is an intelligent, provocative, incisive drama about politics, people, ideals and principles, with razor-sharp dialogue and -- from Jan Maxwell -- a first-rate star performance.
2011-11-29-20111107bothsidesnow.jpgShow trials and screw-ups do not make for true "scandals." But what about GOP efforts to in effect deny the original intent of Article II when it comes to Obama's constitutional power to name judges? Spitzer & Matalin debate this as well as the NSA and Rice-Power appointments.
People in community -- and on their own -- have the right to try new things. They have the right to see old things anew. They
Great teachers are not bound by ideology. Our leaders at the national and state level are also teachers. We need them to decide on a course of action, explain why it makes sense, and engage in honest discourse with those who oppose their actions.
The death of influential former judge Robert Bork marks the conclusion of a career in conservative advocacy, on and off the bench, and the closing of an era in American politics.
Let us extend our sympathy to Robert Bork's family and friends. But let us also take a stand for an important historical truth: the successful fight against his confirmation was a noble cause, and his defeat was one of the most important progressive victories.
It was a classic moment in U.S. Senate history. The late Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) took to the floor on June 23, 1987 to
Democrats opposing Bork's nomination would have seen their votes as not just a stand against a particular judicial nominee but as a vote against the social agenda of an administration they felt was attempting to turn the page on the progress of previous decades.
Bork was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Ronald Reagan in 1987, only to be eventually rejected by the Senate
We are one Supreme Court appointment away from the extremist Republicans' dream becoming the nation's nightmare.
A Romney-Ryan-Bork Court would be a dream for the 1% and the far-right, but a nightmare for everyone else in America.
Romney's dangerous agenda, whatever it is, would last for four years. His right-wing Supreme Court could last for forty years. That's a scary thought for anyone who cares about the rights of women.
Wouldn't it be nice if we had leaders who made choices based not upon a secret code of ideology or moral principle -- on a faith that provides their guidance system -- but upon the actual conditions of an issue as it expresses itself?
As a conservative myself, I wish Biden was less successful in 1988, but the episode should be a warning for those who think Paul Ryan's victory in the vice presidential debate as a foregone conclusion.
To say the Roberts Supreme Court hasn't been kind to women would be an understatement. In 2007, it overruled six lower federal courts in upholding a ban on one abortion procedure with no exception for the health of the woman.
With Robert Bork at the helm, we will see more impunity and more unaccountability in corporate structures that are "too big to fail" and "too big to jail."