robert harris

Told from the point of view of Colonel Georges Picquart, the intelligence officer whose scrupulous honesty finally established Dreyfus' innocence, An Officer and a Spy breathes life into historic events.
Any parent would agree young people can do impulsive and thoughtless things. But what if one of their stupidly spontaneous acts accidentally turns deadly?
Robert Harris is the author of The Fear Index, a thriller set in the world of international finance at a moment when the
Roman Polanski's The Ghost Writer is one of the best films I've seen in recent years. Yet it seems unlikely, at least in America, to break out beyond the art house hit status.
Mine is a secretive profession, more accustomed to the shadows than the limelight. But two new films have made ghostwriters
Tony Blair complained that his widely panned appearance before the Chilcot Inquiry into the origins of the Iraq War stirred up negativity because people are hungry for a conspiracy. If that is so, The Ghost Writer is the movie.
It's always feast or famine: months of movies like Dear John, Valentine's Day, Leap Year -- and then, in one week, new films by both Martin Scorsese and Roman Polanski.
Under Blair, Britain "modernized" as "Cool Britannia," and indicators on the economy, the environment, and crime improved. Then came Iraq, the war too far.