Robert Osborne

Robert Osborne showed us why television, more than any other medium, turned hosts into stars. Osborne, who died Monday at
The man who made you fall in love with movies.
Halfway through the '60s, Hollywood was floundering its way trying to get in sync with and, more importantly in the studios' little bottom-line mind, trying to exploit the revolutionary tide of the times which emboldened that decade to consider itself the epiphany of the century.
What makes something a classic? It's a question worth asking as Hollywood devotes ever more of its resources to remaking movies, TV shows, and comic books from the past as the majority of our movie content today.
Personally, I felt saddened watching Kim, inspired by Eva and shamed at how much money I have thrown at anti-aging procedures and potions over the years.
This year marks the 60th Anniversary of On the Waterfront, the winner of the Best Picture Oscar for 1954. In honor of this weekend's Oscars, we're taking a look at what still makes this film such a timeless classic.
To me, as a gay Jew at this difficult Christmas, thinking about Jean Valjean (and his creator Victor Hugo), even remembering crying my eyes out over him, are all very good. Because goodness is definitely its own reward, and we need to remember that.
About 1,800 fans of Turner Classic Movies partied last weekend on a the network's first ever Caribbean ocean cruise, complete with screenings, Q&A and veteran actors, including Ernest Borgnine, Tippi Hedren and Eva Marie Saint.
Although Turner Classic Movies' Film Festival, which takes place in Hollywood through May 1, coincides with New York City's Tribeca Film Festival, it won't be outdone in terms of star power or screen gems.
As late summer transformed into autumn, milestones in classic film, which focused primarily on iconic leading ladies, dominated