robert whitaker

"I realized that I like what he's saying," the American Freedom Party chairman said.
Psychiatry used to be a biopsychosocial profession that allowed time to get to know the person, not just treat the symptom. But drastic cuts in the funding of mental health services have dramatically reduced the quality of the service they can provide.
Patients with chronic psychotic symptoms usually do quite well on meds and quite badly off them. The decision to stay on or go off antipsychotics has tremendous significance in a person's life -- and is sometimes a matter of life and death.
This is the latest, and perhaps last, of several debates with Bob Whitaker on the role of antipsychotics in treating psychotic symptoms.
Non-sociopathic people feel guilt or shame for having induced suffering in other human beings, so how could the APA not feel guilt or shame about Jeffrey Lieberman and other psychiatrists conducting experiments that create psychotic symptoms and suffering? The answer to this question takes us to a very dark place.
Psychiatry Under the Influence: Institutional Corruption, Social Injury, and Prescriptions for Reform by Robert Whitaker and Lisa Cosgrove aspires to be an important book, but is a misleading one that covers little new ground.
The fresh attention to alternative and "evidence-based" therapeutic approaches, along with the new questions about the value of lifelong antipsychotic medications for people with schizophrenia, can potentially strengthen the way mental health providers respond to this often-devastating illness.
Last week I went to a presentation by Robert Whitaker, author of Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America. Having spent a lot of time in the pharmaceutical trenches, I think my perspective on psychiatric meds is a little different from his, but there were two things in particular that impressed me.
NIMH director Insel now agrees with treatment reform activists that many people diagnosed with schizophrenia and other psychoses could be better served by a more selective and limited use of drugs and more diverse treatments.
HuffPost Entertainment has obtained a few photos from the book. Take a look in the gallery below and share a Beatles memory
Robert Whitaker had the good fortune to be the Beatle's "official photographer" throughout their recording career. His famous shots are part of a hefty new book of photos, "With The Beatles."
Other books, most notably, The Invisible Plague by Dr. E. Fuller Torrey and Judy Miller have done a much better job at documenting
Despite the success of alternative mental health treatments for many people, there still exists bigotry against these approaches.
Since 1955, mental illness disability rates in the U.S. have increased six-fold. At the same time, psychiatric drug use greatly increased in the 1950s and 1960s, then skyrocketed after 1988.
Sam Mendes and Michael Shannon remind us that people who are diagnosed with seriously mental illness can, when feeling respected, say profound things and should be taken seriously.