robert whitaker

"I realized that I like what he's saying," the American Freedom Party chairman said.
Psychiatry used to be a biopsychosocial profession that allowed time to get to know the person, not just treat the symptom. But drastic cuts in the funding of mental health services have dramatically reduced the quality of the service they can provide.
Patients with chronic psychotic symptoms usually do quite well on meds and quite badly off them. The decision to stay on or go off antipsychotics has tremendous significance in a person's life -- and is sometimes a matter of life and death.
This is the latest, and perhaps last, of several debates with Bob Whitaker on the role of antipsychotics in treating psychotic symptoms.
Non-sociopathic people feel guilt or shame for having induced suffering in other human beings, so how could the APA not feel guilt or shame about Jeffrey Lieberman and other psychiatrists conducting experiments that create psychotic symptoms and suffering? The answer to this question takes us to a very dark place.
Psychiatry Under the Influence: Institutional Corruption, Social Injury, and Prescriptions for Reform by Robert Whitaker and Lisa Cosgrove aspires to be an important book, but is a misleading one that covers little new ground.
The fresh attention to alternative and "evidence-based" therapeutic approaches, along with the new questions about the value of lifelong antipsychotic medications for people with schizophrenia, can potentially strengthen the way mental health providers respond to this often-devastating illness.
Last week I went to a presentation by Robert Whitaker, author of Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America. Having spent a lot of time in the pharmaceutical trenches, I think my perspective on psychiatric meds is a little different from his, but there were two things in particular that impressed me.
NIMH director Insel now agrees with treatment reform activists that many people diagnosed with schizophrenia and other psychoses could be better served by a more selective and limited use of drugs and more diverse treatments.
A curated sampling of Whitaker's photos has been presented in a new book, With the Beatles. The book -- available through