Rodgers and Hammerstein

Jelani Alladin and Matt Doyle reimagine “We Kiss in a Shadow” from "The King and I" for those unable to "express who they are."
“We in leadership positions need to do everything we can to reflect the world we live in.”
Being around Florence was a big spiritual lesson for me. She taught me that when you live everyday like it's Valentine's
Do visit and experience the love in this fine production, and also, for those who have not visited us before, see for yourselves the love and sincere welcome Philadelphians offer our visitors.
I seldom talk about it, but if you know me long or well, you know. And I have my mother to thank for it, because I am fairly certain that she was listening to Funny Girl when I was in utero.
In 2013, the fairytale of Cinderella would get another modern day twist with its Broadway adaptation written by playwright
As a child, you most likely sang "Do-Re-Mi" or maybe even "My Favorite Things." And chances are you watched the film version of The Sound of Music, an adaptation of the 1959 Broadway musical about a nun-in-training who becomes a governess to seven motherless children in an Austria about to enter World War II.
It hard to find the silver lining in the cold, blustery weather and increasingly shorter days that mark December in New York, but one thing is the guilt for staying indoors completely evaporates.
Five-time TONY nominee, Kelli O'Hara has had a busy year and it's not going to calm down any time soon.
As bad as things can seem these days for musicals on Broadway -- as vacuous, as child-centric or adult-nostalgic as most Broadway musicals distressingly are at the moment -- the good news is that there are Broadway ticket buyers also paying to see Hedwig. Which is extraordinary.
Within the past month we have read with sadness of the deaths of four important artists who seemingly have little in common: composer and author Mary Rodgers Guettel, internationally famous American conductor Lorin Maazel, Broadway and cabaret star Elaine Stritch, and the legendary operatic tenor Carlo Bergonzi. They do actually have one thing in common: me.
For those of you longing for the original "Sound of Music" starring Andrews, that version will have its annual holiday screening
Impossible things are certainly happening everyday -- Broadway's "Cinderella" helped one gay man's dream come true last week
For many baby boomers, the first images of war they remember did not come from the news. Instead, they were from an extremely popular documentary television series that aired on NBC in 1952 and 1953 and was subsequently made into a feature film.
Earlier this year, I attended the opening nights of two Bay area productions that could not have been more dissimilar. In each case, the audience's final response was telling.
Oklahoma! told a story of victory and it promised a world of flowers and hard work, with room for everyone and yes, with plenty of heart and plenty of hope. That is what I learned.
It was not surprising Cinderella got categorized a "revival" -- after all, as Michael Riedel wrote a couple of weeks ago, that means it is a shoo-in for a nomination. But was that the right call?
This Cinderella has a pleasingly old-fashioned touch, a strong cast and a score that may not be the absolute peak of R&H but which is more tuneful and enjoyable than most shows could hope for.
Revisit a classic and you're sure to discover new facets. That's certainly the case with this gem-like production by Classic Stage Company. Its intimate space is ideal for shining a light on Stephen Sondheim's 1994 masterpiece Passion.