roger ebert dead

"He was really happy that morning."
I distinctly remember the moment Roger Ebert became much more than just "my favorite movie reviewer."
I learned of the death of two people who had a tremendous impact on my life last week: One you've heard of and one you probably haven't. Both helped me understand myself a little better when I was a teenager and then, unexpectedly, taught me something about death and dying as an adult.
With Roger Ebert no longer with us, who remains with the same ability, drive and bravery to inspire our city to rise above our many, many challenges and overcome our differences?
We feel the losses of television icons in a different way than we do our movie stars, politicians, and newsmakers. Our television hosts tend to be our neighbors, like the late Mister Rogers would sing.
At journalism conferences and online, media strivers talk over and over about becoming their own brand, hoping that some
Westboro members previously protested at the funerals of Steve Jobs, Michael Jackson and Matthew Shepard. Plans to picket
Roger was one of us; a Midwesterner, a Chicagoan. A city whose name has been sullied by the likes of Capone, Springer and Blagojavech, could not ask for a better, more redemptive ambassador.
In this episode of MovieFilm, the gang share their thoughts on the global blockbuster G.I. Joe: Retaliation and lionize the
Soul Melanie (known as Wanderer) falls in love with Earth Melanie, even though in theory this isn't possible because the