romare bearden

“The idea is to write it so that people hear it and it slides through the brain and goes straight to the heart.”
There's an abundance of reasons to visit the current set of exhibitions at the Studio Museum of Harlem (the ones on view close on June 8). I'll get to the art itself, but there are some overarching considerations.
Public advertisements have become such a commonplace part of the American landscape that we don't even consciously register them anymore -- that is unless they contain something extraordinary.
Traditional African patterns ornament the ovalescent center while the figure is surrounded at top and bottom with the inherited African motifs of the nation he was born to -- but what is inside Mr. Mitchell is boundless without physical context to distinguish him from any other.
Just when you thought it was safe to go back to the sizzling streets of Chelsea, not expecting to discover something particularly notable in the typical "summer show" venues but nevertheless making the rounds, out pops a truly unique and memorable exhibition that is shaking things up.
Although Andrews has become known for his later images, which were typically easier and lighter, the strength of There Must Be a Heaven lies in showing how long it took for Andrews to get to a place of peace.