Ross Douthat

Obama has repeatedly offered precisely the “unifying story” critics assert our country needs.
Whichever party wins the White House in 2016 could find itself unable to make good on its vision and promises, reaping a whirlwind of difficulties instead.
I'm not angry at Trump. I'm angry at the electorate, at the stupid, self-centered, uninformed, xenophobic, even racist, ignorant, personality-driven voters willing to turn this country over to a man who, as McCullough points out, lacks any of the four key qualities President Dwight D. Eisenhower said a leader must possess: character, ability, responsibility and experience.
But if that exercise is painful, it’s also the correct path to choose. A man so transparently unfit for office should not
A nationally-televised presidential debate stage is, indeed, neither the time nor the place, one would think. This year, however, all the rules have been thrown out and we've got Donald Trump and Marco Rubio comparing relative penis sizes in their effort to become the so-called leader of the free world.
Now that the primaries are getting a lot closer, some are doing mental pretzel-bends to rationalize their gut feeling about Trump's inevitable loss (since their gut feeling can't possibly be wrong, of course.)
Throughout his column, Douthat speaks of how libertarian values restrain fascism--they do. To equate them with conservative ideology, however, is a bit of stretch. Conservatives are not libertarians. Conservatism is not the ally of liberty. It is first and foremost the ally of the status quo and the past. Every attempt to expand human liberty was opposed by conservatives of the day.
Compassion and critical thinking are values we share with morally-sensitive secular humanists and with good people in every religious tradition globally. These values are equally central to the very best of Catholic tradition, not a threat to its survival.
We inhabit a small moment in time in a Church that has endured for 2,000 years and shall endure for many thousands more. The Church will not be shaken to the core if the divorced and remarried are admitted to Holy Communion. It would be nothing more than the practical working out of the Church's commitment to mercy.
Ever since Archbishop Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina became Pope Francis in March of 2013, conservative Catholics have been sounding alarms about his designs on the Roman Catholic church.
New York Times columnist Ross Douthat's critique of the direction of Catholicism under Pope Francis has recently come under attack from some prominent American Catholic theologians.
Liberals and conservatives, Protestants and Catholics are all having to come to terms with an increasingly secular landscape. Aspiring to be more like Ross Douthat's vision of Christian orthodoxy, in other words, is no longer a hedge against decline, if it ever really was.
History offers D.H. Lawrence's warning that influential people shouldn't stimulate others' "personal, superficial, temporary desires" but "tell us of our own deeper desires." The powers that conservatives champion have been doing the former, with increasing velocity.
The question ultimately is why America's moral standards seem to have fallen so far. Drug and alcohol abuse remains widespread. The two-parent nuclear family seems to be quickly disappearing.
The Catholic Church at this moment in history is faced with a rising chorus of right-wing dissent. This movement poses a threat to Pope Francis's reforms, but the threat should not be overblown.
Cummings doubted the issues being debated in Rome and among Catholic intellectuals would resonate with most parishioners
HERE are some things you may know about Lena Dunham, if you happen to have opened the pages of any New York periodical at