rothko

“Most of the interesting art of our time is boring.” - Susan Sontag
A beautiful new documentary illuminates the difference between an art collector and a patron who not only amasses a tremendous collection but whose taste and interests help define an era.
For many years, women artists and writers did their best to keep up with the guys. When the feminist movement came along, they resented being lumped into a category that defined them as "women artists." Helen Frankenthaler, a painter who is having a seriously revitalized pop culture moment, was among those who also resisted this label.
Every afternoon at four o’clock, people gather on the third floor of the Harvard Art Museums to watch them turn off the Rothkos
In Casselman's case, the familiarity with textures, coupled with the thick, tactile, earthy nature of clay that he manipulated with rubber and metal-edged "ribs," naturally and eventually carried over to his unique approach to painting, which he has been exploring for over twenty-five years.
As I walked up the familiar steps and entrance everything seemed as it had been during my time as a student. The inside, however, was quite different and the courtyard was bathed in light, still surrounded by some familiar artwork.
No surprise: the Museum of Modern Art has extended its exhibition of Matisse's cut outs as a result of popular demand. The same happened when the show featuring the master's late in life career debuted in London's Tate.
Thinking is not always associated with abstract expressionism. After all, the technique was called "action painting" and it's quarterback, Jackson Pollock, was intentionally or unintentionally rough around the edges.
"I'm from Texas and will always be from Texas, and if I ever break even, I'm moving back. It's a wonderful place to be from. There's a lot of history there and a lot of stuff that you know about and nobody else knows about."