royal canadian mounted police

#WearRedFriday was the country's way to show everyone is mourning right alongside the province.
The Winnipeg-based volunteers provide support to First Nations.
The federal leader said his party doesn't need lessons "from anyone about openness and inclusiveness.”
An "automatic setting" was selected on Facebook Live, RCMP say.
A 2017 survey dealing with pay ranked the RCMP 72nd out of 82 police services in Canada. Pay discrepancies are having a huge impact on both morale and recruiting. But compensation isn't the only problem plaguing the RCMP. Long back up times are a huge health and safety issue.
Four Mounties took part in an experimental community integration project in Jordan designed to help Syrian refugees and the police force itself.
"The biggest loser here is the Canadian public."
It's a dawn on a warm June morning when I head into the RCMP Depot for a day of education. I'm learning what it takes to be a Mountie. Mine is a crash course -- in more ways than one.
Three RCMP officers were fatally gunned down in Moncton, N.B. on Wednesday while responding to a report of an armed man. Two
On May 16, 2014, the RCMP released their National Operational Review on missing and murdered indigenous women in Canada. Importantly, while this report gives us a good picture of the scope of the problem of missing and murdered indigenous women, it fails to address some important issues that could help Canada meaningfully address this violence. Here, I want to outline some of these failings as a means of provoking critical reflection on the RCMP's response and to contribute to ongoing discussion about how to end this violence.
After a string of reports over 10 years, government legislation Bill C-42, and more recently a report by the Senate Defence Committee providing 14 recommendations for change, our offices continue to receive emails from RCMP staff. The emails provide a grim look into the past, and offer little hope for the future. They are from people at the end of their ropes. Reassurances from Ottawa, they tell us, have little impact on their daily lives and they are looking for real change. Those who have publicly spoken out have been chastised for doing so, but most of victims still love the organization and want to lend a hand fixing it. They are asking us: "what's actually changed?" and more importantly, "what's next?"