running injuries

One of the most challenging parts of running is preventing wear and tear, so here's the low-down on the most common and problematic injuries David Geier, MD sees in runners, how to fix them yourself and when to get help.
The surface you're running on matters, too. For example, if you always run on the left side of a road that has been graded
Compulsivity plus injury equals a challenging equation for both athlete and physician. Addressing this with athletes is a delicate balance. Education is critical for not only validating their doubts but also strengthening one's alliance with the athlete and the compliance with training alterations.
I knew I was in good company when I read What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami. "I'm often asked
I've finally come to recognize that I am breakable, and I am not superman. The only way I will get to accomplish everything that I want to accomplish in my running career is if I break away from the competitive, compulsive nature of being an endurance athlete.
As a track coach once said to me, "Just because they can run, it doesn't mean they know how to run. You wouldn't golf without lessons. You wouldn't play tennis without lessons. What makes you think you can run without lessons?" It couldn't have been better stated.
Maybe it's because running is so quantifiable, but most runners I know love "magic bullets." We want to improve -- it's why we run in the first place -- and we'll typically try anything (within reason) that might help us run more miles or faster times.
Don't look back. That's what I told myself as I rounded the corner of a sun-streaked Central Park somewhere in between the leafy green mile markers and the finish line.
I myself have benefitted from high levels of conditioning overriding fledgling skills, but I know with certainty that unless correct running form is learned, eventually the undue strains of sloppiness will overrun even the greatest muscular conditioning.