Ruthie Ann Miles

The star's 5-year-old daughter was killed in the car crash that occurred two months ago.
The pregnant Broadway star and her daughter were struck by a vehicle that ran a red light in Brooklyn.
A car drove through a red light and into a crowd of people in Brooklyn.
That skill set, when combined with Ruthie's innate understanding of how to tell a story, won her the roles of two vastly
So many musicals to see, I know; but the show, which remains in exquisite condition, now strikes a tone -- emotionally, not just musically -- that has been absent in recent renditions.
It's approximately 24 hours since the Tony Awards ended -- and, while most of the community is at a Bombshell party, I feel like it's about time to reflect on the night that was.
After the telecast (discussed in my post here), Broadway is all about the after-parties. There is the official Tony Gala at the Plaza. Then each show or each lead producer usually hosts their own party.
It was a evening of stars at the 69th Annual TONY Awards last night, with some surprise wins -- rather, vindication for dedicated fans who were excited to see favorites win across categories. The little musical that could, which began at the Public Theater in SoHo and has now swept the TONY Awards just a year later.
I notice this is a surprisingly short account of the year's Tony Awards as scoped from the press room. I can only suggest it's an indication of the excitement the event didn't create from start to finish.
If you ask me, On The Town, which is currently slightly trailing both other contenders in my Tony polling, deserves the win. I, like most, was worried when the show was announced for that barn of a theater, but director John Rando proved the doubters wrong.
If I had to choose the one featured performer in a play or musical, on or off-Broadway, who I thought was giving the best performance this season, it would be Ruthie Ann Miles in Lincoln Center Theater's revival of The King and I.
In a day and age when producers, directors and author's executors think nothing of imposing their so-called artistic vision on Broadway masterworks that were pretty good to begin with, it is heartening to see producers, directors and executors just do the show as written.
The show--with concept and lyrics by Byrne, music by Byrne and Fatboy Slim -- captivated theatergoers and critics last April during its limited engagement as part of the Public season. A hearty band of producers, after a diligent but fruitless search for a larger and more economically-feasible space in which to launch a commercial run, concluded that there is no place like home and have returned to the Public's ballroom-like LuEsther Theater despite built-in budgetary strictures.
Carrie Coons delivered a hilarious acceptance speech for her turn as the drunken Honey in Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of