Safe Schools

A note outside one package read: "To the wonderful people who care for me everyday!"
Let's use this time to address the hate against LGBTQ people that continues to run rampant in our society. Hate that trickles down into our schools.
A rural Virginia school board's discriminatory policy is headed down the toilet, exactly where it belongs. And soon to follow should be the North Carolina law, the South Carolina bill, and other states' proposed legislation putting public bathroom access at the center of the nation's culture wars.
I noticed when looking at the language of this bill would seem to protect students based on the standard anti-discrimination
As many continue to celebrate marriage equality, it's time to direct and extend our movement's focus to our LGBT youth, who are more likely to experience harassment and acts of violence while in school, yet are least likely to receive any help or support from administration.
These curated figures, modest approximations relative to national projections, illustrate some of the costs associated with public higher education in the United States.
In the case of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the Mambwe primary school is evidence of the latest paradigm: Improving student achievement in schools and respective literacy tests depends on having a "safe environment" in the school, including water and sanitation.
A mass abduction that was seen a year ago as unprecedented -- sparking justifiable outrage across the world -- now seems, after a series of further kidnaps, to look like a sadly increasingly familiar tactic in the terrorist arsenal.
While in some extreme cases schools have to be closed when they are at the center of an outbreak, investing in safe schools -- and the return of pupils to receive regular temperature checks and health education -- may be the best way to combat Ebola's further spread.
The Dignity Act is a different kind of anti-bullying law.
I've seen real people have reasonable conversations about guns in America. I've even seen people who support gun ownership
What is needed are interventions that understand the problem of LGBTQ bullying as rooted in cultural values, not in individual "bad" children, and that see schools as sites where traditional genders and heterosexuality are valued, rewarded, and given positions of power and prestige.
Faced with a bullying problem, schools will often reach for the latest anti-bullying program that promises to work, without considering the crucial question -- "will this program work for our school?"
Placing LGBTQ students in a "risk" category -- positions the group of students identifying as LGBTQ as a potential "problem" for the school that requires a solution, rather than as a group of students bringing untapped assets and strengths into the school community.
This sort of policy only ends up forcing students, especially trans students, into living situations where they are harassed and must be on guard at all moments. This further alienates already at-risk populations of youth when we should be including these individuals and building them up.
If you've been paying attention to the national news lately, you've certainly caught wind of the catastrophic budget problems that the Philadelphia public school system is currently facing.
Research consistently shows that building connections between and among students and teachers, teachers and administrators, and the school and parents makes schools safer and offers better support to those who are at risk of becoming isolated, bullied, and teased.
On paper it appears that street crime is down and school crime is down. The reality is the schools are actually less safe. When government agencies run two sets of books they are really no different from a private sector Ponzi scheme.
Each time I think that you cannot possibly have one more fight left in you, you remind me that this generation's capacity for greatness may simply be beyond measure. In the face of overwhelming odds, you respond to those fighting to keep you down by standing up.