safe water

It has been said that networking is both an art and a science; but at Clinton Global Initiative meetings, it is the opportunity for impact. Over the past several years I have had the privilege of working with the team at CGI on issues such as redefining "First Responder" assumptions for humanitarian relief in Africa, and rethinking refugee response paradigms in the Middle East.
One in 10 people don’t have access to the clean water they need to live.
Donating just $15 can provide water for a child for a year.
Ensuring safe water requires water suppliers to monitor this essential resource, but also requires citizenry to monitor the water suppliers.
Safe Water Network was co-founded in 2006 by the late actor and philanthropist Paul Newman. In 2008, Safe Water Network established field offices in Accra, Ghana and New Delhi in India. Paul's dream has made is possible to give over a quarter of a million people daily access to safe water.
We knew things were bad when water coming out of the kitchen taps in our homes in Flint, Michigan, looked like frying oil and smelled like an open sewer. We're not water experts; we're moms.
The front page of the New York Times recently blared: 60 Million People Fleeing Chaotic Lands. It went on to say that a rising number of armed conflicts has caused "an unprecedented global exodus that has . . . littered deserts and seas with the bodies of those who died trying to reach safety."
A 2010 study in British medical Journal, The Lancet, said one in five deaths in Bangladesh were due to arsenic poisoning
It was at that moment that something clicked for me. These water businesses could do so much more than just increase access to clean water; they could provide opportunities for an often marginalized group in northern Ghana -- women -- in an area where they were already experts.
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