safe water

It has been said that networking is both an art and a science; but at Clinton Global Initiative meetings, it is the opportunity for impact. Over the past several years I have had the privilege of working with the team at CGI on issues such as redefining "First Responder" assumptions for humanitarian relief in Africa, and rethinking refugee response paradigms in the Middle East.
One in 10 people don’t have access to the clean water they need to live.
Donating just $15 can provide water for a child for a year.
Ensuring safe water requires water suppliers to monitor this essential resource, but also requires citizenry to monitor the water suppliers.
Safe Water Network was co-founded in 2006 by the late actor and philanthropist Paul Newman. In 2008, Safe Water Network established field offices in Accra, Ghana and New Delhi in India. Paul's dream has made is possible to give over a quarter of a million people daily access to safe water.
We knew things were bad when water coming out of the kitchen taps in our homes in Flint, Michigan, looked like frying oil and smelled like an open sewer. We're not water experts; we're moms.
The front page of the New York Times recently blared: 60 Million People Fleeing Chaotic Lands. It went on to say that a rising number of armed conflicts has caused "an unprecedented global exodus that has . . . littered deserts and seas with the bodies of those who died trying to reach safety."
Drinkwell CEO Minhaj Chowdhury said the company had sold 208 units across India, Bangladesh, Laos, Nepal and Cambodia since
It was at that moment that something clicked for me. These water businesses could do so much more than just increase access to clean water; they could provide opportunities for an often marginalized group in northern Ghana -- women -- in an area where they were already experts.
BPA-free plastic. Almost all plastic items -- from water bottles to toys -- now boast that they are BPA-free. This is great
Access to clean, potable water is a central issue for slum dwellers around the world and is often a time-consuming endeavor that involves walking great distances. Water is often expensive, demanding a large portion of families' budgets.
From the hills of western Kenya to the coastlines of Haiti, blue bins are popping up unexpectedly across local landscapes.
The economic consequences of water stress are clear to the naked eye. Emaciated livestock, ravaged crops, and the exposed and cracked beds of lakes make for powerful images. But what can't be seen is equally menacing.
How much do you know about the water and sanitation crisis? Take a short quiz with Matt Damon, co-founder of Water.org, to find out.
The next hurdle: How to get these pumps -- which typically cost $25 to purchase and install -- into the hands of poor farmers
We must not let the nation's superb water resources deteriorate, and we must work to improve the management and protection of our water systems.
As we gather at our Passover tables and consider the feast ahead of us, let us take the injunction, "All who are hungry, let them come and eat," to heart. Give to help the world's vulnerable children. It will make your Seder even more meaningful.
Greywater is wastewater generated from daily activities like washing dishes and doing the laundry. Finding a better way to manage greywater is essential.