Saint Leo University

Recently, a faculty colleague from another university asked if I thought it appropriate for the chief information officer to chair the university's strategic planning committee and would it not be more appropriate for a faculty member to be the chair.
With the closing of two more private not-for-profit colleges in recent months, many more college leaders and boards across the country realize they must take the difficult steps required to ensure survival for their institutions.
Although Saint Benedict walked this earth more than 1,500 years ago, his teachings remain relevant in today's business world. This is especially true for higher education.
There is a tremendous financial burden being unfairly heaped upon students. What was supposed to be a public service to provide greater accessibility to a college education for those who lacked other options now preys upon those it's supposed to help.
The incredible diversity of mission, students, and programs that make it impossible to rank schools is the foundation of the great strength of the best higher education system in the world.
Prospective online students often ask us is "How do I know if I'm ready for an online course?" For adult students who may be juggling full-time jobs, families or other obligations the answer almost always involves time commitment.
I am not going to argue that a four-year college education isn't expensive. It is. I won't argue that its return on investment makes it worthwhile, although it surely does. I also cannot argue that increasing the number of administrators doesn't increase the cost of a higher education. It does.
The cost of textbooks has been rising at an average annual rate of six percent. While students no doubt have been aware of the issue all along, cringing at the start of each semester as they tally the costs for course materials, legislators have finally caught on.
In a time of economic hardship, meeting financial obligations in full removes one major concern. The problem, however, is too many schools believe their work in embracing veterans begins and ends with the Yellow Ribbon Program.
Many colleges and universities call themselves "veteran-friendly." Although being friendly is a noble virtue, it often falls short of the measures that can actually lead to a vet's success after graduation.
There is little doubt: the Rutgers athletic department has been a mess for the better half of the past year, damaging a great university's image nationally. There are important lessons to be learned from how this happened.
Many adult learners enrolling online for the first time may be somewhat apprehensive about online education. After all, their only experience of learning has been in traditional, face-to-face settings. Other adult learners expect it to be fun, fast, and friendly.
For many, the job interview is the most terrifying moment of the application process. It has caused countless qualified applicants to lose their cool under pressure, sometimes unraveling completely through vocal tremors and sweaty palms.
Indeed, Coursera, another commercial entity, now claims well over a million students and more than 30 institutional partners, many among the so-called elite. And not to be left behind, two existing giants, Google and Pearson, have entered the arena. So what to make of MOOCs?
Colleges and universities do what they can to save money in their day-to-day operations. In tough fiscal times, that's more important than ever.