Salafi

A group of professed Muslim radicals "had no basic knowledge about Islam,” according to a new study.
A double murder in Florida exposes how two brands of violent extremism share common hates, and sometimes the same followers.
Georges Fahmi, European University Institute This article has been updated to reflect the latest developments on Egypt’s
Religious does not mean radical.
The Twitter data about Iran, considered in light of the skew toward older Saudis in the telephone survey, also hints at a
ISTANBUL -- Turkey's strategy of supporting the Salafi factions in Syria, and its huge public relations machinery that praised the fighters, normalized Salafism in the eyes of many ordinary, pious Sunni Turks.
Egypt's Sisi is no moderniser or reformer. Nor is the military establishment that he hails from. His core trait when it comes to ideology and thought is his being opposed to Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood group, and that could be largely related to power struggle more than it is to ideology.
I've got some good news for you, General Public: You don't need to be afraid of your Salafi neighbors. Sure, ISIS is scary (that's their goal), and al Qaeda is violent and intently inhumane, but we don't need to paint all Salafis with that broad jihadi brush.
A three-minute video, posted by a Saudi government-backed organization to YouTube on June 4, has garnered 150,000 views in 48 hours and sparked a discussion in the kingdom about how to stem sectarian conflict.
Does the situation of present-day Muslim society, marked by crisis, tensions, foreign interventions and political despotism, foster the reformist democratic Islam, or does it promote its violent and theocratic rivals?