Sally Hemings

Shannon Lanier believes that monuments to the third president should be kept out of public spaces.
I do not celebrate Thomas Jefferson or Sally Hemings. I celebrate opportunities where I can overcome the flaws in my family tree and embrace the greatness of my inheritance.
The push-pull of their competing visions still fuels our politics, but we live in Hamilton's world, not Jefferson's.
This is what gets me that Callender's claim was refuted by his contemporaries believing that he lied and the entire tale
Madame Infamy follows the lives of three extraordinary women who lived during the same historical period but whose stories have never before been told in relationship to one another: Sally Hemings, Marie Antoinette and Madame Marie Tussaud
Enjoy the fireworks and flags, the barbecues and bargain sales. But hold this thought as well: that behind this Fourth of July holiday are human beings who were as flawed and conflicted as they were inspired. If they were to look upon us today, they most likely would think how much remains to be done.
In the summer of 1791, Alexander Hamilton was the target of what a modern-day espionage novel would call a "honey trap," set by a blonde 23-year-old named Maria Reynolds.
What Thomas Jefferson's severe lapses in what we might call (as a generic) "Christian" behavior meant was that he was merely human.
Although the Thomas Jefferson-Sally Hemings rumor survives, no reasonable, sensible person hearing all the evidence, not just rank speculation, has ever declared his or her belief in it.
All of these books should provide some correctives to the deep misunderstanding -- or desperate ignorance -- of this extremely important chapter in American History.