salva kiir

Gunfire rang out around the capital of the world's newest nation.
The peace deal was hanging by a thread until the opposition leader's homecoming.
"Greed is driving the calculations of South Sudan’s government and rebel leaders," the leader of one advocacy group said.
Certainly, the U.S. can and should lead the way in promoting free speech across the world. But when it comes to promoting a free press and protecting the media in transitional states, perhaps the world would be better off following the lead of countries like Ghana.
The peace agreement that President Salva Kiir finally signed on August 26 - that will hopefully ensure an end to South Sudan's current conflict - includes justice provisions that offer a chance to break a decades-long cycle of brutal abuses that South Sudanese have endured for too long.
"The intensity and brutality of violence aimed at civilians is hitherto unseen."
African diplomatic sources said the agreement, which has not been made public, sets out how the two leaders would share power
Such involvement contradicts China's traditional doctrine of non-interference in foreign countries' domestic disputes, but Beijing's economic and geopolitical interests in South Sudan have convinced it to bend its rules.
This confluence of forces has made catastrophe inevitable; the question is not whether famine will strike, but where and how hard -- and how many thousands of lives will be lost.
While aid is crucial, especially to the 3.7 million people who are currently experiencing emergency levels of food insecurity, transformation for the world's newest country has to come from within.
Early in December preparations began to celebrate the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) signed on January 9th 2005, which eventually led to the creation of South Sudan, the world's youngest nation. On or about December 15th, only two years a sovereign state, major violence escalated throughout South Sudan.
The deadly turmoil that erupted in Juba last month threatens to ignite a full scale ethnic civil war across South Sudan. If peace talks between the government and the White Army rebels fail to stem the violence, a potential genocide may result.
South Sudan's neighbours have given the warring sides until Tuesday to lay down their arms and begin talks, without giving
It has taken decades of work and the loss of millions of lives for African countries like Rwanda to recover from bloody civil wars. It is unconscionable that the people of South Sudan be left vulnerable to a similar fate.
Two and a half million people died before South Sudan, the world's youngest nation, became independent in July 2011. But in just one week, fighting spread among former liberation leaders, thrusting the country into the cusp of a civil war.
"Opportunities were certainly missed to engage in more robust preventive diplomacy over the past few months as the political