Sam Harris

"Love is always going to stick around to help you when you need it."
There's no need for releasing the Searchers to find out the cause for the current incredulity about God. At some point in
Just over 65 years ago, Alan Turing famously posed the following question: Can machines think? In Computing Machinery and Intelligence, Turing investigates the concept of Artificial Intelligence (AI), the idea that machine-based life may indeed meet or surpass the boundaries of human intellect.
Noted atheist author and public intellectual Sam Harris has once again appointed himself a relevant arbiter on matters he is only tenuously familiar with.
The fundamental problem with religion is that believers--about 5 billion people right now on Planet Earth--are so sure they're "correct" on anything and everything they believe.
In his book The Better Angels of Our Nature, Steven Pinker argues that ours is a remarkably peaceful era. He may be right
Harris claims that I am being hyperbolic when I argue, as I did in Salon, that he "dehumanizes Muslims to such an extreme degree that it verges upon bloodlust." If my description of his words is hyperbole, how should the following words be described?
It seems it is not only the far right that seizes the opportunity of every calamity that befalls us and every terrorist attack to unleash their exclusionary and hateful rhetoric towards Islam and Muslims. Self-proclaimed enlightened liberals do too.
In a free society, often uncomfortable things must be said to opposing parties to effectively work out complex issues. But when someone attempts to criticize the beliefs of a religion (mostly Islam), the left will invariably attach that criticism to racism.
Since the attacks on September 11, 2001 there has been a relentless and carefully crafted campaign in several quarters of social and mainstream media to demonize both Islam and Muslims. The current wave of hatred is neither an overnight occurrence.
Glenn Greenwald and Noam Chomsky exemplify the attitudes of non-violence, freedom of thought and justice that are the essence of liberalism. They are the relentless advocates of moral relativism that an increasingly globalized world requires to pave the way for pluralism and tolerance.
Harris's next book will be, perhaps, his most controversial -- which is a rather impressive claim for the author of books that claim to disprove the notion of free will and call for the end of faith in America.
It surprised me to find this book by Sam Harris so helpful in my own search for a deeper meaning in life; and I was more surprised still to discover, halfway through, that Harris's path had led him to the study and practice of Dzogchen Buddhism -- into which, thanks in good part to McLeod's book, I have been delving in my meditation practice.
The end is not near for religion in America -- or elsewhere in the world. What analysts are trying to divine, however, is the mystery of why more people are indicating "none" when asked their religious affiliation.
Are quotations from a religious book really enough to indict an entire religion? With this in mind, listed here is a mix of verses from the Quran and the Bible. Is it obvious which book is the mother lode of bad ideas and which one is the religion of peace?
Unlike classical atheists like Bertrand Russell and George Bernard Shaw who advocated their views and advanced the critique of religion with wit and erudition, the "new atheists," seek to ply their trade through the economy of outrage.
If you were to ask me who the best male pop singer in the country is, I would immediately say Sam Harris. After seeing Ham, the adaptation of his beautifully written and often humorous memoir Ham: Slices of a Life, at Ars Nova, I'm even more committed to my belief.
The more willing we are to tell the truth about how we feel, what we see and what we want, the easier it becomes and the more likely we are to realize the health benefits - to our bodies, to our relationships and yes, even to our businesses. Telling the truth is the honest path to better health.
Since his highly controversial exchange with Ben Affleck and Nicholas Kristof on October 3rd, Bill Maher has insisted that he's simply stating the unpleasant facts about the Muslim world. But there are two particularly noxious myths that need to be debunked.