sandy relief

Bon Jovi says Ocean County suffered the worst damage from the October 2012 storm, but has not gotten a proportionate share
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) had choice words on Tuesday for property owners who were unwilling to give federal officials
When House Republican leaders yanked the Hurricane Sandy relief bill from the floor back at the beginning of January, the
"Retreat" might not be a good word to use for what needs to be done. It infers losing. "Adjustment" is a better word. We must adjust to the reality of our shifting shores.
In his recent inaugural address, President Obama spoke about not debating the role of government, but rather ensuring we "act in our time." A hundred days after Sandy, as many are still struggling to put their lives back together, is certainly the time to act.
Former Sen. Al D'Amato has called the opponents of Sandy relief a "bunch of jackasses." It's a term they should embrace. I recognize that many potential members of the Caucus may not seem qualified -- after all, they have requested assistance when disasters have struck their districts in the past.
Northeast lawmakers blasted the amendment, noting that dozens of other disaster relief bills had passed in recent years without
Flooded subway stations in New York City. Earthquake damage in the Nation's Capital. The great city of New Orleans under water. These scenes, once seemingly out of science fiction, are all too real today. This is why I am introducing the Homeowners' Defense Act of 2013 in Congress.
WASHINGTON — The House has voted to add $33.7 billion to legislation to help victims of Superstorm Sandy, the late-October
The House Republican leadership vowed late last year that their first order of business in the new Congress would be passing
While Congress fiddled with appropriations for communities devastated by Superstorm Sandy, the CDFI sector in many of those communities was busy finding and funding small business owners and others who wanted only to get back on their feet.
Out of the 67 GOP representatives that turned their back on the people of New York and New Jersey in their darkest hour, there are (at least) 10 that deserve dishonorable mention for going above and beyond the call of duty in their pitiless pursuit of cutthroat partisanship.
A Republican congressman who voted against federal funding for Hurricane Sandy relief last week asked the federal government
Disaster relief and reconstruction is a central element of the fundamental, irreducible responsibility of government: security. If we are to live in a civilized community, we need to figure out a way to fund, develop and maintain enhanced disaster response capacity.
I mean, seriously, Hurricane Sandy was a monumental national disaster of epic proportions -- and I'm not even exaggerating. How small, petty, mean-spirited, hurtful and inhuman do you have to be to not want to do everything you can to help?
A $9.7 billion bill to pay flood insurance claims from Sandy sailed through the House earlier Friday, following outrage from
"People are waiting to be paid," said Rep. Frank LoBiondo, R-N.J., whose district includes Atlantic City and many other coastal
Despite a late-stage intervention by Vice President Joe Biden, House Republican leaders failed to advance the Senate's 2012 reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, an embattled bill that would have extended domestic violence protections to 30 million LGBT individuals, undocumented immigrants and Native American women.
"I invite them to take a tour of our nearly non-existent shoreline while they adjourn this week. They will see what I saw
"What's done is done," King said of Boehner failing to move the bill on Tuesday – a far cry from the tirade he unleashed