sarajevo

Aja Aguirre is a fierce femme of color fashion blogging extraordinaire. Her blog Fit for a Femme includes some swoon worthy
Nineteen years ago I was on my way to the first concert of my life. I was seventeen. It was exhilarating, exciting. The day was full of promise that the history was about to be made. I was no ordinary teenage girl.
Egypt. It would happen in just a matter of days, he insisted. I agreed that something was brewing, but I dismissed his notion that it could happen so soon
“What he’s been saying is really totally crazy, ridiculous ... he is totally nuts.”
I watched as they walked away, heading towards downtown Cairo, Mohamed in the middle, like some kind of political leader surrounded by his people. I wondered what it would take for him or one of his friends to one day be just that in a country that had been politically and socially sterilised by dictatorship.
@MuhamedSacirbey with contributions from Aida Sehovic & Edina Skaljic "Conceived as a participatory nomadic monument, "Što
This is not just about Bosnia but rather the reactionary appeal of nationalism, populism and manifestations of walls, physical and psychological.
It's generally not war that refugees choose to remember, but the people who help you. My mother's colleague who snuck us out of Serbia, French volunteers who took refugee kids camping, and those who came to welcome us at the airport when we were resettled in Ohio; those are the people I think of daily. I hope Basel finds such people on his path too.
"This woman told me, 'I want that sniper, before he shoots me, to know he is killing a beautiful woman.'"
The battle for the survival of Sarajevo deserves a much greater devotion than can be addressed in a short blog. It has been given too little attention by film makers and politicians, and its lessons and links to current ills still too often not comprehended. Those politicians who failed in their initial test to rescue Sarajevo then set into refashioning the story to reflect their own stereotypes and agendas. Many were also eager to escape the responsibility for allowing the longest modern siege of a city to perpetuate for almost four years, and no one could claim ignorance of either the suffering or the methodology of the siege.
Five stops later, the tram inches up to the platform of the Baščaršija stop and I hop off. I take a few steps and am in front
I can't believe you were the one to catch my eye. I don't believe in love at first sight, but the second I saw you, I was already in too deep. I had never seen such a place like you, with your enigmatic past and thriving future.
Walking through Sarajevo in 2016, I realize just how incomplete my narrative of BiH once was. I'm not reminded of war as much as I'm reminded of kindness, in the face and warm welcome of each local I encounter.
Margalit Fox's Times obituary of Svetlana Boym, the Curt Hugo Reisinger professor of Slavic languages and literatures and comparative literature at Harvard ("Svetlana Boym, 56, Scholar of Myth and Memory Dies, NYT, 8/22/13) discusses one of her works, The Future of Nostalgia.
Poverty in the modern world is a reality we can change. Poverty should be seen and understood today as a scandal that calls for moral and practical action.
20 years is a long time. What human beings can accomplish in just two decades can be astounding, just look back at the internet (such as it was) in 1995. Now think of how transformed 21st century lives have become by the two decade evolution of computer technologies.
I am a Woman in Black from Belgrade. I was one of the organizers of the the first feminist conference in East Europe, Drug-ca Zena in 1978 in Belgrade. I am also the author of "The Diary of the Political Idiot," maybe the first war diary written by a woman distributed over the Internet.