school-food

I recently attended the annual meeting of the School Nutrition Association, the trade group that represents the 55,000 food service workers who have the thankless job of feeding millions of schoolchildren every day.
At the same time that we are arguing for healthier meals in school cafeterias, we also have a long-standing tradition of turning our school kids into candy pushers in order to raise funds for their team uniforms or their band trips. But it doesn't have to be lke this.
Districts are still unconscionably underfunded when it comes to school food, and Big Food still plays too large of a lobbying role in shaping what appears on kids' trays.
The Nation piece ultimately concludes that few if any truly significant changes have been made by the food industry as a result of Ms. Obama's program. But the fact that Ms. Obama can't (or won't) wage war with Big Food has never surprised me.
For the majority of districts struggling to meet the new school food standards with inadequate funding and labor, the highly processed, lower priced, heat-and-eat entree will continue to remain an alluring option.
The agricultural spending bill that gutted the pizza rule will expire at the end of the current fiscal year, i.e, September 2012, creating an opportunity to revisit the issue.
The USDA's announcement that school districts will be able to opt out of an ammonium-hydroxide treated ground beef filler known as both Lean Finely Textured Beef and "pink slime" is not exactly inspiring confidence.
Three fast food giants -- McDonald's, Burger King and Taco Bell -- have discontinued their use of "Pink Slime." But while fast food customers can vote with their dollars, students must passively consume whatever the federal government sees fit to feed them.
These changes help our kids see that we aren't just telling them to eat better -- we as a community are willing to invest in the food they are served at school to help them grow up as healthy, smart, and strong as they can.
There are 32 million reasons why the USDA's new school meal standards are good news. That's the number of children in the U.S. and who will soon be served far more nutritious, and hopefully delicious school meals.
We're eating the same way an earlier, much healthier generation ate -- my grandmother's generation. They healthfully subsisted on a steady of diet of mostly home-cooked, real, whole foods (some of them grown in their own gardens) with periodic treats.
A classroom in a NYC Public School dedicated solely to teaching elementary school kids how to create tasty food with real, fresh, non-processed ingredients. I had never heard of anything like it.
At Marin Academy, a high school in San Rafael, California, the county's private school kids were eating what we all should be eating: organic, locally grown, whole foods with a wide variety of fruits and vegetables in their school lunches.
Food policy councils have never existed before at the national level, but last week I attended the White House Childhood Obesity Summit, and it certainly had the flavors of one.
Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution is cooking up more than home made meals from fresh ingredients. The show has already stirred up deeply seeded emotions about school food feeding systems... all before the first episode airs tonight!
Welcome to another steaming poo-poo platter of Agribriz propaganda served up by a biostitute whose foundation is fossil-fueled by Archer Daniels Midland, Exxon, Ford, GM and Chrysler.
Our culture treats our children like cattle, fattening them up on corn and soy by-products. If we love our kids so much, why have we let Big Food turn them into cash cows for Big Pharma?