school testing

Schools with a healthy school culture tend to be mission-focused schools with a shared sense of purpose. The mission shows up in school-wide activities that are done well and consistently, like a daily morning meeting.
I believe that the ESEA reauthorization should allow for schools and districts to take a streamlined, positive, student-centered approach to annual assessment then annual testing. In order for this to work, the assessment must be aligned to college and career standards.
We should stop obsessing about test scores and start obsessing about the health and well-being of children and their families. The gains would be far more valuable than a few points on a standardized test.
Decoupling? Not going to happen. You can't have a data system without tagging, and you can't have a tagging system with nothing to tag. Education and teaching are just collateral damage in all this, and not really the main thing at all.
Designing a plan without the leadership of those who know the system best is more like misanthropy than philanthropy. For those who tell me they want to assist our schools, I will not sign on until I know educators are at the center of the decision making.
For parents, the fear is that their precious child might become collateral damage in the struggle to correct this unmitigated destruction that is happening to public education.
This week begins the make-or-break, do-or-die standardized testing that will label your child a success or a failure. I urge you not to let your child take the state test. Opt out.
We need to have higher expectations for ourselves as educators, parents, and policymakers; and we need to have higher expectations for our students -- they will meet the bar wherever it is set.
All are complex problems, entwined in money, ideology and bureaucracy and exceedingly difficult to repair. But there is one broken element in public education that is apolitical in nature and costs zero to fix.
“Once we put students in groups, we give them very different opportunities to learn — with strong patterns of inequality
The controversy over standardized testing was given new focus by the recent Chicago teachers strike. One of their major objections was to having the Chicago Board of Education use these tests heavily to determine teacher competence.
Instead, many educators believe "detracking" or "heterogeneous or mixed-ability grouping" ensures success across racial lines
Here's a simple idea to turn this around: devote 1 percent of educational expenditures to evaluating what the other 99 percent
"Please do your best," I say. "Please don't make me look bad." That one is their favorite -- and why shouldn't it be? It empowers them as do few aspects of their education.
The practice was uncovered when fellow teachers blew the whistle. The city and state education departments are now investigating
Online assessment will power the future of customized learning -- the best chance we have to dramatically boost achievement levels.
Using test results to drive teacher and leader effectiveness is akin to poking the raw batter with a toothpick. Which is why it hasn't worked and is not going to.
With one set of academic standards now serving as the educational guideposts in nearly every state, questions are hovering
How do we make sure that testing is perceived as informative and challenging, rather than as a series of anxiety-filled experiences that disrupt real learning?