school turnaround

The arts are not just a flower, they're a wrench The programme, however, will have to adapt to survive. Because it was set
C. M. Rubin Our Top 12 Global Teacher Bloggers gave advice on how to foster inspiration in the classroom. A novel idea came
It's a perfect world, I have to admit. And I know that at some time in my life I became an optimist. After all, you can never create a negative impression for an optimist. Just try it.
By all means we need high expectations in our schools. But with the spotlight on income gaps, it's time to draw in the missing parts of the picture. Poverty is real. We need action at the statehouse, not just the schoolhouse, to enable educators to succeed in spite of it.
In his paper, "Is School Reform Working?", Professor Geoff Masters explores whether or not the policy settings for Australian schools are on track to ensure future improvements in that country's decade-long decline in the PISA test. I caught up with him recently to get some answers to the questions I had.
Arne Duncan admits "churn," but never admits defeat. He's always already moving on to the next renaissance.
In December, I continued my conversations with world leaders on the frontiers of education reform. These leaders all share a commitment to transforming education at the ground level, so that the poorest and most disadvantaged schools can become sites for development.
In 2003, the provincial government of Ontario, Canada initiated a focus on educational improvement as one of its key strategies for the future success of its people and its economy. Since then, the entire system has dramatically improved.
School Improvement Grants, a signature program of U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, has poured about $5.9 billion
Still, Duncan sounded cheerful in a statement released to accompany the report. "The progress, while incremental, indicates