science of race

A new paper explains why it can be dangerous to think otherwise.
A new study suggests a technique to stop stereotyping before it's ingrained.
What are the origins of the concept of human races? People with "similar" skin color might have very different shapes of
In his response to comments by me, Jon Marks and Jennifer Raff, Wade does not take on any substantive aspect of the debate; rather, he misrepresents the science again and takes a shot at our credentials as scholars. Here is a very quick response to his comments, in hopes of correcting the record and getting this debate back to the science.
Three attacks on my book A Troublesome Inheritance have appeared on The Huffington Post's blog this month. For readers puzzled by the stridency and personal animus of these compositions, I'd like to explain what is going on.
Wade can't justify his first and primary point: his claim that the human racial groups we recognize today culturally are scientifically meaningful, discrete biological divisions of humans. This claim provides a direct basis for the whole second half of the book, in which he makes speculative arguments about national character.