scientific literacy

"Science isn't always right," agrees Rundgren, "but trusting in the nature of scientific knowledge is the best way to make
The early Republican Presidential caucuses and primaries have put a spotlight on evangelical religious voters, reminding the secular (scientifically literate) community of the differences between their worldview and the one held by the Religious Right.
The election year of 2016 will present opportunities to bring scientific literacy into the debates around climate change and more. The future of our democracy may depend on raising the level of scientific literacy, not only among the population of voters, but among the candidates.
In college, students who are not in the sciences or engineering must take some science classes as part of the general education
When it comes to scientific topics, both scientists and laypeople hide behind the excuse that the general public in this country simply doesn't have the education to process such complex information. This is leading to real problems.
Children grow up healthier and happier when they experience a direct connection to nature. Just as importantly, those young people are also far more likely to value the natural world when they've developed a connection to it. The need for this has never been greater than it is today.
The oxygen we breathe, the water we drink and the sugar we eat are all chemicals. But somehow "chemical" has become a dirty word, synonymous with "toxin," and "chemical-free" is now a popular, albeit nonsensical, advertising slogan.
I am dismayed by the request by Answers in Genesis for equal time in Cosmos for creationist viewpoints. Answers in Genesis is dedicated to a literal young-Earth creationism that declares that the Earth was created in six 24-hour days around 6,000 years ago.
In a time of great divides over religion and politics, it's not surprising that we treat evolution the way we do political issues. But here's the problem: As settled science, evolution is not a matter of opinion or something one chooses to believe in or not, like a religious proposition.