scientific literacy

Join me and globally renowned thought leaders including Sir Michael Barber (UK), Dr. Michael Block (U.S.), Dr. Leon Botstein
The early Republican Presidential caucuses and primaries have put a spotlight on evangelical religious voters, reminding the secular (scientifically literate) community of the differences between their worldview and the one held by the Religious Right.
The election year of 2016 will present opportunities to bring scientific literacy into the debates around climate change and more. The future of our democracy may depend on raising the level of scientific literacy, not only among the population of voters, but among the candidates.
Most people don't have to know the details but they certainly should know the impacts. Their lifestyles and maybe their lives
When it comes to scientific topics, both scientists and laypeople hide behind the excuse that the general public in this country simply doesn't have the education to process such complex information. This is leading to real problems.
Children grow up healthier and happier when they experience a direct connection to nature. Just as importantly, those young people are also far more likely to value the natural world when they've developed a connection to it. The need for this has never been greater than it is today.
The oxygen we breathe, the water we drink and the sugar we eat are all chemicals. But somehow "chemical" has become a dirty word, synonymous with "toxin," and "chemical-free" is now a popular, albeit nonsensical, advertising slogan.
I am dismayed by the request by Answers in Genesis for equal time in Cosmos for creationist viewpoints. Answers in Genesis is dedicated to a literal young-Earth creationism that declares that the Earth was created in six 24-hour days around 6,000 years ago.
In a time of great divides over religion and politics, it's not surprising that we treat evolution the way we do political issues. But here's the problem: As settled science, evolution is not a matter of opinion or something one chooses to believe in or not, like a religious proposition.
Carl Sagan's Cosmos series is legendary for its ability to bring science to a wide audience and was far more than mere entertainment. We look forward to the March 2014 rebirth of Cosmos, which will be hosted by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.
Perhaps we could teach science to politicians? It is an attractive idea, but which busy politician has sufficient time? In
After years of being held at the mercy of commercial publishing interests, scientists are beginning to wake up and take steps to recoup the rights to their own work.
We should be worrying about the more than 100 million Americans who think the earth is 10,000 years old and trying to figure out how that happened. Marco Rubio is simply an expression of that large problem.
Miller is the director of the Longitudinal Study of American Youth at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research
Physics fans went wild over this week's announcement that scientists at CERN had discovered a particle consistent with the
I have no expectation that every man, woman, and child should strive to become a professional scientist. But I do have every expectation that every man, woman, and child should strive to become more scientifically literate.
Consumers of science prefer simple messages and have heightened confidence in biological evidence to explain behavior. That may be human nature, but scientists should be careful not to play into these pervasive biases.
I am going to suggest four things in hard science you can learn to get started. Pick one and dive in. It won't hurt, and it might be fun.