Scientific method

Dr. Ian Lipkin, who directs Columbia University’s Center for Infection and Immunity, worked with actors in the 2011 film.
Investigators found that fragments apparently are “deliberate forgeries created in the twentieth century."
Whether this fantasy will ever be realized remains to be seen. I admit it seems far-fetched in a country where about 40 percent
Objective truth does not yield to the whim of opinion, but our society has tragically forsaken that fundamental foundation. Facts matter. Experience matters. Education matters. Reality matters.
The fundamental problem with religion is that believers--about 5 billion people right now on Planet Earth--are so sure they're "correct" on anything and everything they believe.
If you cherry-pick scientific truths to serve cultural, economic, religious or political objectives, you undermine the foundations of an informed democracy.
Remember when NASA shuttle landings warranted ducking out of school or work to watch on a restaurant TV because they were so exciting? How did we lose our love of scientific inquiry and exploration? In part it's because Americans no longer respect experts, let alone scientific ones.
Four hundred years. And scientists are still at it. Chasing odd questions. Trying things that might not work. Driven by curiosity, not short-term profit. Plenty they can teach us entrepreneurs about innovation.
We are all ignorant; none of us have all the answers. That fact is not only a strong argument in favor of free speech and against those who would suppress it -- it is a spur toward greater wisdom.
Everyone loves coming up with solutions that make positive change in the world, but sometimes they are a mirage. You come up with a solution and drive toward it like a sparkling lake in the desert, only to find it evaporate as you close in on the actual problem that needs solving.