scotland referendum

Congratulations, Brexit voters. You got what you wanted and opened the proverbial Pandora's Box. Now you get to own the consequences of your actions.
In most people's minds, "democracy" means elections. The citizen's role is to be an informed voter. Most discussions of Scotland's referendum assume that the moment of vibrant democracy is over. But there are some like Whitman who see much greater promise in democracy.
Why on earth did the Scots, largely quiescent as part of Great Britain for three centuries, suddenly become the mouse that roared? It wasn't because they became besotted watching re-runs of Braveheart or Rob Roy, or even because they coveted more of a share of North Sea oil revenues. No, the Scots got sick and tired of Thatcherite policies imposed from London. Thanks to the partial form of federalism known as "devolution" provided by the Labour government of Tony Blair in 1997, Scotland got to keep such progressive policies as free higher education and an intact national health service, while the rest of the U.K. partly privatized the health service and began compelling young people to go into debt to finance college like their American cousins.
This week, the world reeled from a welter of cross currents. Though the "yes" vote on independence lost in the end, the Scottish referendum revealed a passionately dis-United Kingdom. Elsewhere, Chinese President Xi Jinping arrived in India, the other Asian giant, calling for a global economic alliance of the "world's factory and world's back office." On Wall Street, China's Alibaba launched what is expected to be the biggest market valuation of an IPO ever. Pope Francis, meanwhile, mused that we had already entered "a piecemeal WWIII." In an exclusive commentary for The WorldPost, former U.K. Prime Minister Gordon Brown argues that the real quarrel of his fellow Scots is with the dislocations of globalization, not the Union. (continued)
For almost everybody in Scotland the referendum vote is seen as not the end of the matter; the key question is, "What now?"
The overwhelming majority of the British media celebrated on Friday morning when the Scottish people voted to remain part
"On the one hand he can make claim to the title of 'the man who saved the union'. On the other, he'll now have to deliver
How the Scottish Referendum alters the notion of culture in the European Union.
Scots headed to the polls on Thursday to take part in a historic referendum on whether to end more than 300 years of union
The first thing was the enormous error committed by David Cameron, the prime minister of the U.K., in not permitting three