Seasickness

Travel
Because praying to the porcelain goddess is no way to spend a vacation.
Healthy Living
How to decode what the voices in our head are really trying to tell us.
Comedy
I've never been much of a meditator. Thoughts flash too fast and furious on a wide range of equally irrelevant subjects. My nails are worn to nubs from picking and biting. But, at age 51, I've finally experienced the power and beauty of lack of thought.
Wellness
Thirty years of extensive travel have left me with a wealth of wonderful memories, and a wealth of medical "experiences" and near crises. This is not an exhaustive list of medical tips, but a personal one.
Environment
The world ocean is a sick sea. The symptoms are no longer deniable; the evidence mounts daily in nauseating waves of reported spills and leaks, dying reefs, depleted fisheries, and vast areas so oxygen-deprived that nothing lives. I keep looking for the good news.
Post 50
Neither my nails nor scissors worked this time, so I called my husband, Mighty Marc, who continues to be a fine example of virile manhood. At 79, he still cuts his own meat and chews with his own teeth. If anyone could do it, he could.
Travel
We are on a bus, which is carrying us to a port, where we will load up a ship. Nothing unusual about that. Nothing strange, except for our fat wool hats, our puffy penguin-y parkas, our knee-high insulated boots. Nothing weird but where we are: Punta Arenas at the southernmost tip of Chile. And where we are going: to the isolated, ice-walled bottom of the world.
Environment
Every human need for the future -- fresh water, food, energy, medicine, security, and psychological renewal -- is dependent on a healthy, sustainable world ocean. The ocean is our cure. Why would we destroy it?
Travel
Getting seasick on a cruise can easily ruin your vacation. Whether you're a first-time cruiser or a seasoned one, it's important to know what you can do to ensure that rough seas don't banish you to your cabin. Here's what to pack (and do) before you set sail.
Wellness
"Seasickness is mostly mind over matter," said Capt. Joe, adding that he used to get sick as a boy when he went on fishing trips with his father and uncles. "You grow out of it."