seaweed

Impact
It could feed a ballooning population and help the environment, but that may not be enough to get people to eat it
Green
The industry is lauded for its sustainability, but challenges are emerging as business booms.
HuffPost Video
"This is only the beginning. There are 10,000 edible plants in the ocean."
The WorldPost
The thick beds of kelp growing near Sisimiut, Greenland, inspired an enterprising teacher to launch a new business and revive
Taste
It's healthy, sustainable and increasingly tasty. What's the catch?
Environment
Australian climate scientist Tim Flannery suggests we could cool the climate with massive seaweed farms to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.
Wellness
Now this is a superfood: Researchers from Oregon State University have reportedly created and patented a new strain of nutrient-rich seaweed that tastes like everyone's favorite fetishized breakfast meat.
Taste
Chris Langdon holds pieces of a strain of dulse seaweed that he patented for OSU.  Toombs, along with Michael Morrissey
Green
A zero-input food like kelp has great potential to remain cost-competitive in any market, especially as growing scarcity of cropland and fresh water drive up the prices of conventional crops and feedstocks. As the price of freshwater rises, sea vegetables will become the most affordable food on the planet.
Food & Drink
The ocean still contains a near-infinite bounty of food. We just need to seek it out.
Food & Drink
Kombu is commonly used as a main ingredient in a savory Japanese soup stock called dashi. It is also referred to as konbu
Food & Drink
Bottoms up!
Environment
This weed constitutes shelter for such species, an incubation place for plankton, sea urchins, periwinkles, and other shellfish, young adult lobsters, and other coastal animals, above and below the waterline, that forage there for nutrition.
Food
Here are the culinary trends and predictions of a food writer and a serial attendee of the Fancy Food Show.