second wave feminism

In 1971 in Cambridge, Female Liberation began publishing The Second Wave Magazine: A Magazine for the New Feminism. Zooming
I had the enlightening opportunity to interview the creators of the Podcast, Promoting Secular Feminism on the state of Feminism today. Please listen in and share!
If you have someone in your life who is a feminist activist or works to empower women, keep it simple and get them one of these must-haves. Or, if you're the diehard feminist, put these on your wish-list or subtly hint to family and friends that you've been dying to read/try/wear one of the gifts on the list.
My son, Ariel, and my daughter-in-law Shannon organized a very beautiful and a very meaningful birthday party for me.
Given Petronio's NYC connection, it's no surprise that his company will perform at the Joyce Theater this week. There's no other venue that so aptly captures the haunting enthusiasm and open intimacy that the city harbors, all of which is reflected in Petronio's repertoire.
Dore documents the hilarity, excitement and outright boldness (along with the scandalous moments) of the Movement. If you thought for one moment these women lacked chutzpah, Dore quickly disabuses you of the notion.
Feminism never touched that. Feminism meant I would go to college, that I would use birth control to avoid unwanted pregnancy and that I would see women in the workplace. Feminism meant that I was aware that girls were treated differently than boys. But it never went further than that for me.
It's back-to-school season for most and stepping back into the scene isn't easy for a lot of students -- especially LGBTQ students.
Second-wave feminism included many lesbians who didn't know many trans women, because few were out and active in those circles in the '70s, and found it very easy to weave into their philosophy the absurd idea that trans women are "the avant-garde of the patriarchy's invasion of women's spaces."
Western feminism has made some memorable theoretical mistakes; a major one is the frequent assumption that, if women held the decision-making power in society, they would be "kinder and gentler" (a phrase devised for George H.W. Bush in 1988 to appeal to the female vote). Indeed, so-called "second-wave" feminist theory abounds in assertions that war, racism, love of hierarchy, and general repressiveness belong to "patriarchy"; women's leadership, by contrast, would naturally create a more inclusive, collaborative world. The problem is that it has never worked out that way, as the rise of women to leadership positions in Western Europe's far-right parties should remind us. Leaders such as Marine Le Pen of France's National Front, Pia Kjaersgaard of Denmark's People's Party, and Siv Jensen of Norway's Progress Party reflect the enduring appeal of neofascist movements to many modern women in egalitarian, inclusive liberal democracies.
To read recent pieces in Slate, Jezebel, and the Washington Post, it seems that the selfie controversy counts as news, so I thought I'd explain why this middle-aged woman thinks it's much ado about nothing, except perhaps Second Wave silliness and shallow pop psychology.
Feminist historical amnesia might be fine if things were great for us now, if the battles had been won and stayed won and egalitarianism were the order of the day. But let's face it: these fights were never won.
When I asked if she thinks Hillary will run for President, she answered: "I haven't talked with her, nor do I know if she
In the late 1960s no one could imagine the possibility of multiple female Secretaries of State, just as they couldn't imagine a two-term African-American President. And to get from there to here took a lot of courage and struggle by many, many people.
Girls isn't about women who refuse to grow up -- it's about women who are trying to grow up in a world in which economic prospects are dim; a world in which men and women can't seem to connect meaningfully or trustingly with each other at any level.
We need to be allowed to simply be women, and not be shamed or idealized for wanting what we want, when we want it.
I'll own it. The reason I'm mesmerized by the girls in Girls -- the hapless, aimless, tragic victims -- is because of guilt. We've let these young women down.
We make our own decisions with our partners, if we have them, alone if we do not, and we must be willing to bear the consequences. Most of the kids will turn out fine. Some won't. The best thing we can do is learn when to let go and let them take responsibility for their own paths.