seizure

At first blush, it may seem like civil forfeiture is different than the usual methods of justice: targeting poor people who have nothing and placing them in jail. As hard as state and federal governments may try, you can't take nothing from nothing so indigent populations are impervious to forfeiture schemes.
What can you do as someone living with epilepsy to help? Here are five things you can do to help:
Law enforcement officials in Oklahoma are distraught about a bill to reform civil asset forfeiture.
I can most certainly tell that since my epilepsy diagnosis, my heart has swollen with compassion, with love, with understanding and sympathy because I know what it is to face pain, heartache, loss and many other feelings.
CBD appears to be a safe drug with no addictive effects, and the preliminary data suggest that it may have therapeutic value for a number of medical conditions. Addressing barriers that slow clinical research with CBD would accelerate progress.
A person's seizure experience is unique to the individual. Having seizures is a major inconvenience to our lives. It's not fun. It's unsettling. It's uncomfortable. We don't want it in our lives. We want it gone. Forever. These are my experiences.
The Bill of Rights was designed to protect the People from their government. That's quite literally becoming history today as new challenges, now from local law enforcement, chip away at the Fourth Amendment's protections of privacy.
The idea of limiting an American citizen's travel proactively, on the assumption that she or he will end up fighting with ISIS based on documents or web postings, scrapes at liberty, even if the tools are there and it is legal to use them.
In Post-Constitutional America (2001-Present), the government has taken a bloody box cutter to the original copy of the Constitution and thrown the Fourth Amendment in the garbage.
While skyping into a meeting with the ACLU, Edward Snowden may have saved a woman's life when he noticed her having a seizure on screen.